Maintenance

Gov. Brown wants to fix California's highways


flickr photo shared by 1Flatworld under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-ND ) license

Yesterday California Governor Jerry Brown help a press conference at the Port of Oakland to call for a bipartisan solution to fund the state's needed highway reapairs. Brown was evasive about the actual mechanisms to be used to raise funds, refusing to say anything about taxes. 

Then how can the state fund these necessary improvements? A recent report from ITS Davis,"A Funding Compromise Can Set Transportation on Path Toward Sustainability", proposes: 

The funding recommendations include a one-time use of corporate taxes to allow states to reduce the backlog of maintenance needs. The federal gas tax would be continued and indexed to inflation. Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets would be set for each state and states would be allowed to ‘buy down’ their gas tax as they reduce their GHG emissions. States would be given pricing and tolling authority and have the authority to implement a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) tax. States would also assume responsibility for all roads. Taken together, these strategies would set transportation on the path toward sustainability.

For VMT-based pricing, we're still waiting for conclusive numbers from Oregon's recent implementation. Research has indicated that other types of road-pricing in California will need to be tailored to specific regions to be successful. It clear that even without the political will to raise it, the gas tax alone is not stable enough to fund the infrastructure repairs on the horizon. 

Friday Seminar - Jeff Lidicker on Pavement Resurfacing Policy for Minimization of Life-cycle Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Pot hole and dent - #71/365

Tomorrow's TRANSOC Friday Semiar has Ph.D. candidate Jeff Lidicker presenting, "Pavement Resurfacing Policy for Minimization of Life-cycle Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions."

In recent decades pavement management optimization has been designed with the objective of minimizing user and agency costs.  However, recent analyses indicate that pavement management decisions also have significant impacts on life-cycle GHG emissions.  This study endeavors to expand beyond minimization of life-cycle costs, to also include GHG emissions.  We extend previous work on the single-facility, continuous-state, continuous-time optimal pavement resurfacing problem, to solve the multi-criteria optimization problem with the two objectives of minimizing costs and GHG emissions. Results indicate that there is a tradeoff between costs and emissions when developing a pavement resurfacing policy, providing a range of GHG emissions reduction cost-effectiveness options.  Case studies for an arterial and a major highway are presented to highlight the contrast between policy decisions for various pavement and vehicle technologies.

The seminar will take place on December 9 at 4:00 PM in 212 O'Brien Hall. (That's a new location!) There won't be a Cookie Hour this week as well. We'll see you in the new year!

Carmageddon's come and gone

 405 closure from Sunset Bridge

Carmageddon was a success! The Caltrans project to replace the Mulholland Drive bridge which closed the stretch of Interstate 405 between the San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles went more smoothly than expected. Check out this time lapse video of the construction.  Part of that success was a result of the PR campaign by LA Metro and Caltrans. It was also a hot topic on Twitter. They reopened 405 early, which could mean incentive pay for the contractor

 

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