Public Transit

Friday Seminar - Rabi G. Mishalani on Schedule Based Transit Operations

This Friday's TRANSOC Seminar features

Rabi G. Mishalani, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science, The Ohio State University, presenting on "Analysis and Quantification of the Effects of Schedule-Based Transit Operations Control on Service Reliability."

The effects of bus drivers' reactions to schedules, given the status of the buses they are operating, on service reliability are investigated and quantified analytically and empirically. The hypothesis that drivers may deliberately, as a form of control, lengthen or shorten dwell times at stops or adjust speeds between consecutive stops depending on whether buses are ahead or behind schedule is examined. An analytical relationship is derived, based on which an empirical study is conducted. The relationship describes the progression of reliability from stop to stop as a function of drivers' possible reactions to the schedule in the presence of exogenous factors. Such reactions are explored in an empirical study using a large Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) data set collected by The Ohio State University's Campus Transit Lab (CTL). The drivers' reactions to the schedule are found to be helpful in improving service reliability. Moreover, the magnitudes of the improvements in reliability, resulting from such reactions, and the deterioration of reliability, due to exogenous factors, are quantified. Given the reliance on CTL data in conducting this study, a brief motivation, history, description, and uses of CTL are discussed as well.

Rabi Mishalani is an associate professor at The Ohio State University with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science. His areas of interest and expertise include the application of probability modeling and statistical methods to the planning and managing of public transportation and transportation infrastructure systems. He is playing a lead role in developing and directing OSU's Campus Transit Lab (CTL), a "living lab" that supports research, education, and outreach. He also is the co-director of the US DOT Region V University Transportation Center.

The seminar is Friday, November 4, 4-5pm, 406 Davis Hall.

Friday Seminar - Weihua Gu on Capacity Models for Curbside Bus Stops

LACMTA

Tomorrow's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features Ph.D. candidate Weihua Gu presenting, "Capacity Models for Curbside Bus Stops with Multiple Berths."

When multiple bus lines merge at a busy, multi-berth bus-stop in a congested city, long bus queues might occur due to an inadequate number of berths.  Disruptive bus overtaking maneuvers and chaotic passenger boarding processes may therefore ensue at the stop.  To unveil the cause-and-effect relations behind this congestion, models are developed to predict the bus-carrying capacity for curbside bus-stops.  These capacities are functions of the stop’s number of bus berths, and other key operating factors.  An analytical solution is derived for a queueing model that describes the unique operating features of serial bus berths.  The results from these models show that conventional wisdom in this field is incomplete and incorrect in many instances.  The proposed models can provide practitioners better guidelines for choosing the number of berths to achieve a desired capacity at a curbside bus-stop.  The models also give insights to improve ways of operating the stop.  These ways include, but are not limited to, allowing or prohibiting bus overtaking maneuvers under certain circumstances, and strategies to manage passenger boarding and alighting processes.  Further, these bus-stop models can be applied to other serial queueing systems in the transportation field, including taxi queues, Personal Rapid Transit systems, and toll plazas with tandem booths.

The seminar will take place from 4-5 pm in 406 Davis on October 14. Please come to TRANSOC's Cookie Hour preceeding the seminar at 3:30 pm in the library. 

MTA shuts down for Hurricane Irene - can you use transit for evacuation?

7th Avenue Station

As the East Coast braces for Hurricane Irene, New York MTA announced a system shutdown on noon Saturday. This after Mayor Bloomberg ordered mandatory evacuations. Given that 41% of New Yorkers rely on tranist as their primary mode, this makes evacuation interesting. There has been research on using transit for emergency evacuations. Such as this case study from Alabama, Transit Evacuation Planning: Two Case Studies by Turner et al., and Transit-Based Emergency Evacuation Simulation Modeling by Naghawi and Wolshon. 

Our thoughts are with you all on the East Coast this weekend. Good luck and stay safe. 

 

 

TOD is big in CA: How SF BART and LA Metro are working with developers in cool ways

Ed Roberts Campus2

Recently the Architects Newspaper published a feature about collaborations between transit agencies and developers. They discuss the approaches used for some of the different projects, listing pros and cons. They also split it regionally by the Los Angeles Metropolitan area and the San Francisco Bay Area. Some of the project highlighted include the Del Mar Transit Village in Pasadena, Amstrong Place in San Francisco, and the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley (pictured above).  (via Planetizen.)

Derailment Raises Issue of Second NY/NJ Transit Tunnel

A Northeast Corridor train derailment disrupted New Jersey Transit service to and from New York earlier this week. The derailment and resulting commuter nightmare has some transit riders calling for officials to reconsider the decision to kill the Mass Transit Tunnel. Groundbreaking for that project, which would have resulted in a second transit tunnel under the Hudson River, was held in 2009, but New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie killed the over-budget project in October of last year. The governor has indicated a willingness to consider other projects to increase transit capacity between New Jersey and New York. An Amtrak derailment earlier today is causing further headaches for NJ Transit.

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