Events

On Ramp for d3.js - March 20th!

 

Do you want to use d3.js to make data visualizations to effectively communicate your research but don't know where to start? This Thursay, March 20th, in the Lower Level of the Blum Center join VUDLab from 6-9 PM for On Ramp for d3.js.

Our "On Ramp for d3.js" is designed to get people across disciplines the needed tools and know-how to create simple and easy-to-manipulate data visualizations. By the end of the night, we plan to have our participants complete two web-based visualizations and get the baseline tools needed to begin learning d3.js on a more serious level. Think of our event as your first crash course in creating interactive tools to show off your work! We will be providing food and soft drinks for everyone (don't worry... we got you).

Details of the event can be found here

Friday Seminar: Planning, Design and Technical Aspects of Rail Transit Lines and Networks

Railing on Water

This Friday's Seminar is not to be missed. University of Pennsylvania Professor Vukan Vuchic, who wrote the book on urban transit, will present, "Planning, Design and Technical Aspects of Rail Transit Lines and Networks."

Growth of cities and increasing car ownership in recent decades have created a great need to build rail transit systems – LRT, Metros and Regional Rail. With their high-performance and high level of service, these modes compete well with private cars and serve large ridership. Their permanence influences urban form and land use development with high livability. The characteristics and roles of these three major modes of rail transit will be described. The alignments of their lines and networks will be reviewed. Positive and negative characteristics of different types of lines, such as radial, diametrical, circle, trunk/branch and others will be defined. This will lead to a comparison of two basic types on networks, those with integrated and with independent lines, illustrated by examples from many world cities. Current trends and likely developments in the roles and usage of different high-performance rail transit modes, such as “in-fill stations,” articulated metro cars, double-decker Regional Rail cars, Unattended Train Operation– UTO, will be reviewed. References will be made to BART development, innovations and experiences, as well as other rail systems in the Bay Area, such as MUNI and Caltrain.

The seminar takes place Friday March 7, 2014 from 4-5 PM in 534 Davis. TRANSOC Cookie Hour will be at 3:30 in the library. 

Friday Seminar: Some Approaches to Enhance Road Safety: Beyond Engineering Based Strategies

Tomorrow's ITS Friday Seminar is Dr. Shashi Nambisan, a professor at the University of Tennessee, presenting, "Some Approaches to Enhance Road Safety: Beyond Engineering Based Strategies"

Road safety is a significant concern to a broad range of stakeholders. Various approaches and strategies have been used to enhance road safety across the world. In this regard, the 4 Es used to characterize safety initiatives are Engineering, Education, Enforcement, and Emergency medicine. The developed nations have adopted a more comprehensive approach to incorporate the 4 Es, while the less developed nations focus primarily on engineering initiatives. The seminar will highlight some of the strategies adopted in Las Vegas, Nevada and across Iowa in the United States. These will be complemented with comments about challenges involved in improving overall road safety in Kerala, India. Further, examples of effective non-engineering based strategies will be presented. The seminar will also touch upon lessons learned from these experiences, and key considerations that are important for sustainable success of campaigns to enhance road safety.

The seminar will take place Friday, February 28, 2014 in 534 Davis from 4-5 PM. TRANSOC Cookie Hour will be in the library at 3:30.

Friday Seminar: Travel Time Reliability and Network Traffic Performance

Travel Times

This week's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features Professor Hani Mahmassani of Northwestern University presenting "Travel Time Reliability and Network Traffic Performance: Selected Highlights from Recent Research"

Reliability of travel time in traffic networks is affected by a variety of factors,some external (e.g. demand surges, weather) and others inherent to the behavior of the traffic stream, reflecting complex dynamics among interacting agents. Yet remarkably simple collective effects emerge when examining the relation between the standard deviation of the trip time per unit distance to the corresponding mean at the network level. We examine this relation for several networks using both simulated and actual data from vehicle probes. We connect this variance to other traffic variables defined at the network level, providing a simple characterization of travel time reliability as a function of density. We consider within-day and day-to-day variability and propose a compound gamma model to capture overall variation. To evaluate the reliability implications of different transportation options and operational strategies using simulation tools, a scenario-based approach is proposed and demonstrated.

The seminar takes place this Friday, February 21, 2014 from 4-5 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour commences at 3:30 in the library.

Friday Seminar: The Cycling Gender Gap: What do Sex, Power, and Fashion Have to Do With It?

Bike4Life Oakland 2009

This week's TRANSOC Friday Seminar looks at gender and cycling. Professor Jennifer Dill of Portland Sate University will present, "The Cycling Gender Gap: What do Sex, Power, and Fashion Have to Do With It?"

In larger urban areas in the US, women make up only about one-third or fewer of the adults who bicycle for transportation. This is in contrast to major bicycling cities such as Copenhagen and Amsterdam where a gender gap in bicycling is non-existent. For cycling to make a major contribution to improving the sustainability of US urban areas, the gender gap must be addressed. This talk will discuss the history of women and the bicycle in the US, then draw upon national statistics and research from Portland, Oregon to explain why girls and women are not bicycling for transportation and what might change that.

The seminar will commence on Friday, February 14, 2014 from 4-5 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour will take place at 3:30 in the library. 

Friday Seminar: Innovations in Traffic Safety Research

photoadayproject (44)

Tomorrow is Friday, which means there's another TRANSOC Friday Seminar taking place. This week features Professor Moshen A. Jafari of Rutgers University. He will present, "Innovations in Traffic Safety Research".

Traffic crashes and accidents at intersections, roundabouts and roadway segments result from many complex factors, but at a basic level, they are outcomes of the interactions among vehicles and other road users. Since few direct measurements of these interactions are available, engineers and planners instead attempt to understand them by studying crashes and accidents reports. As crashes account for a tiny fraction of safety conflicts, these reports fail to provide a full understanding of what is happening at the points of accidents. This is especially true of crashes involving pedestrians and bicycles, for which data are sparse, making it difficult to determine reliable patterns. In this talk we will present risk based traffic safety models using multiple data streams, including near miss data, systemic data, historical traffic accidents, and drivers’ naturalistic behavior data. We will also briefly discuss ongoing research at Rutgers on the development of Plan4Saefty software, which is currently being used by the State of New Jersey for traffic safety analysis and planning.

The seminar will be held Friday, February 7 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 534 Davis Hall. Cookie Hour commences at 3:30 here in the library. 

Friday Seminar: Road Vehicle Automation History, Opportunities, and Challenges

Automated Car

It's a new year, a new semester, and a new TRANSOC Friday Seminar! This week PATH researcher Steven Shladover presents, "Road Vehicle Automation History, Opportunities, and Challenges".

Road vehicle automation has recently attracted intense interest from the media, the general public and now the transportation community. This interest is largely based on serious misconceptions about the level of automation of road vehicles that is likely to be achievable within the foreseeable future. This presentation addresses those misconceptions, beginning with a historical overview going back to 1939, and continuing with definition of multiple levels of vehicle automation. The importance of communication and cooperation among automated vehicles and between these vehicles and the roadway infrastructure is illustrated with examples from experiments conducted at the PATH Program. The technical challenges that remain to be resolved before fully automated driving can become reality are explained.

The seminar will take place Friday, January 31, 2014 from 4 - 5 p.m. in 534 Davis Hall. And of course, Cookie Hour returns preceding the Seminar at 3:30 in the Library. See you then!

Friday Seminar: SFpark: A New Approach to Managing Parking

Parking meters...four/five forms of payment

Today's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features Jay Primus talking about SFpark

SFMTA established SFpark to use new technologies and policies to improve parking in San Francisco. SFpark works by collecting and distributing real-time information about where parking is available so drivers can quickly find open spaces. To help achieve the right level of parking availability, SFpark periodically adjusts meter and garage pricing up and down to match demand. Demand-responsive pricing encourages drivers to park in underused areas and garages, reducing demand in overused areas. Through SFpark, real-time data and demand-responsive pricing work together to readjust parking patterns in the City so that parking is easier to find.

This presentation will be an overview of SFpark, a new approach to managing parking that is being demonstrated in San Francisco. We will run through a deep overview of the project’s planning, implementation, and operation, and touch on lessons learned and relevance for other cities.

The seminar takes place from 4:00-5:00 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour commences at 3:30 in the library. See you then!

Friday Seminar: Adaptive Optimization Methods in System-Level Bridge Management

Halsted bridge

This week's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features ITS Berkeley PhD candidate Haotian Liu presenting Adaptive Optimization Methods in System-Level Bridge Management.

An adaptive optimization approach, known as Open-Loop Feedback Control (OLFC), is presented for Maintenance, Repair and Replacement planning of systems of bridge components. The proposed implementation of OLFC in Bridge Management Systems is intended to improve bridge management decision-making and deterioration model learning. The OLFC approach is capable of providing more accurate models than the state-of-the-art methods and yielding system cost-savings over any planning horizon when condition survey data are used to update the bridge component deterioration models. OLFC also enables agencies to consider different model classes when learning deterioration models. To illustrate the desirability of this approach, a planning agency is considered to manage a system of facilities with limited prior knowledge of the deterioration models over a designated planning horizon. OLFC is shown to improve model accuracy and reduce system costs, with a demonstration of how to incorporate system budget constraints when the system is heterogeneous. The discussion is confined to bridge decks, the component of bridge structures that undergoes the fastest deterioration, but the methodology presented in this paper is applicable to all bridge components.

The seminar will take place on Friday November 22, 2013 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour will be taking place as usual in the library at 3:30 PM. 

Friday Seminar: A statistical process control framework to support health-monitoring

Overseas (Old) Highway Bridge, Missouri & Ohio  Key Channel

This week's TRANSOC Friday Seminar is all about infrastructure! Pablo L. Durango-Cohen from Northwestern University will talk about structural health-monitoring. 

In this talk, we describe development and field application of a process control framework to support structural health-monitoring and management of transportation infrastructure. The work is motivated by technological advances that allow for continuous, long-term, simultaneous collection of various response measurements, as well as the factors that contribute deterioration. The framework provides an integrated, generally-applicable (to various types of structural response data) statistical approach that links performance modeling and structural health monitoring. The framework consists of two parts: The first, estimation of statistical models to explain, predict, and control for common-cause variation, i.e., changes, including serial dependence that can be attributed to usual operating conditions. The ensuing standardized innovation series are analyzed in the second part of the framework, where we use single and multivariate control charts to detect special-cause or unusual events. We illustrate the proposed framework with analysis of strain and displacement data from the monitoring system on the Hurley Bridge (Wisconsin Structure B-26-7).

The seminar takes place Friday, November 8, 2013 in 534 Davis from 4:00-5:00 PM. Cookie Hour (of course) precedes in the library at 3:30. 

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