Events

Institute of Transportation Studies Friday Seminar: A sensor-based and spatially-enabled system for next generation Intelligent

Depth

Friday's Transportation Seminar is all about smart infrastructure. James Tsai from Georgia Tech presents, "A sensor-based and spatially-enabled system for next generation Intelligent and sustainable infrastructure management."

Roadway infrastructures, including pavements, bridges, and signs are deteriorating rapidly due to material aging, improper usage, harsh environments, and damages resulting from natural or man-made hazards. With the advancement of sensor technologies, it become feasible to collect the large-scale in-field detailed infrastructure data, such as 3D pavement surface data, using high-performance cameras, lasers, LiDARs, and Inertial Navigation System (INS) to gain better insight understanding of the large-scale in-filed infrastructure behavior. This talk first presents a framework for the sensor-based and spatially-enabled next generation Intelligent and sustainable infrastructure management system, including the key components of data acquisition, automatic information extraction, data integration, and intelligent infrastructure management. An intelligent sensing system has been developed, using 2D Imaging, Laser, LiDAR, and GPS/GIS Technologies with artificial intelligent and pattern recognition to automatically detect pavement surface distress, including rutting, cracking, raveling, etc. along with their detailed level characteristics for determining pavement health condition. The availability of high-resolution roadway images, 3D pavement surface data, and 3D LiDAR data has brought us a great opportunity and new challenges. This calls for a new concept to model this detailed level of big data for revealing new values for infrastructure management. First, we need to effectively extract valuable decision-support from this big data. For cracking, an innovative crack fundamental element (CFE) model that is a topological representation of cracks to support crack classification, diagnosis, and intelligent pavement management will be presented; this CFE provides researchers a mathematical foundation for modeling large-scale, in-field pavement/infrastructure crack characteristics to study crack propagation behavior at multiple scales will be presented. Examples of developing an innovative and sustainable pavement preservation method and developing intelligent crack sealing planning using emerging sensor technologies will also be presented.

The Friday Transportation Seminar takes place on September 12, 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Cookie Hour immediately precedes it at 3:30 PM in the same location. (Note: Cookie Hour is not in the library!) There will be a no-host Happy Hour at LaVal's at 5:00 PM.

Institute of Transportation Studies Friday Seminar: Large-Network Travel Time Distribution Estimation for Ambulances

Ambulance in Georgetown. BW.

It's almost Friday, so it's almost time for the Friday Transportation Seminar. Remember that this semester the seminars and Cookie Hour are in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Buidling. We also encourage you to follow along (and participate) with the Twitter hashtag #itsberksem

This week's Friday Seminar features Dawn Woodward from Cornell presenting, "Large-Network Travel Time Distribution Estimation for Ambulances."

We present methods to predict the time required for an ambulance to drive to the scene of an emergency. This forecast is critical for deciding how many ambulances should be deployed at a given time, where they should be stationed, and which ambulance should be dispatched to an emergency. Specifically, we predict the distribution of lights-and-sirens ambulance driving time on an arbitrary route in a road network, using automatic vehicle location data and trip information from previous ambulance trips. We train a statistical model using a computationally efficient procedure; challenges include the large size of the network and the lack of trips in the data that follow the route of interest. We demonstrate the operational impact of our methods using data from Toronto Emergency Medical Services, and discuss ongoing efforts to incorporate our methods into a software package used by ambulance services.

The Friday Seminar takes place on September 5, 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining BuildingCookie Hour immediately precedes it at 3:30 PM in the same location. (Note: Cookie Hour is not in the library!) There will be a no-host Happy Hour at LaVal's at 5:00 PM.

Institute of Transportation Studies Friday Seminar: Lessons Learned from Spatiotemporal Studies of Freeway Carpool Lanes

WIDE LOAD

Late August means the end of summer is nigh, students are back, classes are in session, and it's the return of the Friday Transportation Seminars. This semester there are some changes to the seminars - Cookie Hour and the seminar will take place in the same location in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Buidling. We also encourage you to follow along (and participate) with the Twitter hashtag #itsberksem

This week's Friday Seminar features ITS's own Professor Michael Cassidy presenting, "Lessons Learned from Spatiotemporal Studies of Freeway Carpool Lanes."

The presentation explores how the segregation of distinct vehicle classes on a roadway can improve travel conditions for all of the classes. Insights come using freeway carpool lanes as case studies. Spatiotemporal study of real sites shows (i) how the activation of a continuous-access carpool lane triggers reductions in vehicle lane-changing maneuvers, and (ii) how the reduced lane-changing can “smooth” and increase bottleneck discharge flows in a freeway’s regular lanes. Theoretical analysis predicts that, thanks to this smoothing effect, even underused carpool lanes can diminish both the people-hours and the vehicle-hours traveled on a freeway. Relevance to bus lanes is briefly discussed. Further insights come via critiques of certain practices that degrade the effectiveness of carpool lanes. Spatiotemporal traffic data reveal that a policy aimed at improving carpool-lane speeds has backfired, owing to a friction effect. The policy mandates the eviction of select fuel-efficient hybrid vehicles from carpool lanes. These evictions have caused queues to expand in regular lanes during the rush. And these expanded queues, in turn, slow vehicles in the adjacent carpool lanes. Spatiotemporal data further show that efforts to combat the friction effect by deploying limited-access carpool lanes can also backfire, because the designs for these lanes are prone to creating bottlenecks.

The Friday Seminar takes place on August 29, 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Cookie Hour immediately precedes it at 3:30 PM in the same location. (Note: Cookie Hour is not in the library!) There will be a no-host Happy Hour at LaVal's at 5:00 PM.

Friday Seminar: Quantifying the Impact of Flight Predictability on Strategic and Operational Airline Decisions

THA A340-500 taxiing for spot.

Tomorrow is the last day of the semester - well done, students! You made it to the end! It's also the last Friday Seminar for the school year. Wrapping things up in style, Berkeley Ph.D. candidate Lu Hao will present her research, "Quantifying the Impact of Flight Predictability on Strategic and Operational Airline Decisions."

The idea of predictability or (inversely) variability is not new in the field of ground transportation, where (un)predictability mainly refers to the unpredictable variations in travel time and is thus directly related to uncertainty of travel time. In the realm of commercial air transportation, there is limited knowledge of how to quantify predictability and assess the potential benefit of improved predictability. Moreover, different aspects in airline decision making require different considerations when trying to measure and assess flight predictability.

In this work, the concept and metric for flight predictability is developed for both strategic and operational airline decision making. For both aspects, the appropriate measure for predictability is defined and the behavioral relationship between predictability and decision making is revealed. The potential benefits from improved predictability are then assessed for the two aspects, using airport departure queue assignment optimization and benefit pool analysis. The saving from improved predictability is significant for both cases, if the right metric is used. Comparing the two aspects, the difference in measuring flight predictability is rooted in the different perspectives of airlines’ consideration.

The Seminar takes place in 212 O'Brien (note the different location!) from 4-5 PM on May 16, 2014. There will be no cookie hour. 

Friday Seminar: The Impact of Adverse Weather on Freeway Bottleneck Performance

Raindrops keep falling on my screen...

It's almost the end of the semester, but we still have two more Friday Seminars! This week is the penultimate seminar featuring Ph.D. candidate Joshua Seeherman. He'll be presenting his research, "The Impact of Adverse Weather on Freeway Bottleneck Performance."

Daily commutes in and out of major cities by automobile will likely encounter multiple locations of delay known as bottlenecks where demand exceeds capacity. It has been long perceived that the performance of these bottlenecks decrease when they are affected by adverse weather such as rain, snow, or fog. This project utilizes existing methodology to measure the discharge rate for four freeway bottlenecks in Orange County, California during both clear and adverse conditions. After confirming that the results agree with past literature, a new model will be proposed attributing different periods of bottleneck congestion during either wet, windy, or foggy conditions to specific weather characteristics. Generic results that can be applied to multiple sites will be shown which will validate the new proposal and hopefully provide guidance for other locations where wet weather is a significant source of delay.

The seminar will take place today, Friday May 9, 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 212 O'Brien. (Note the room change!) Cookie Hour is on this week as well, at 3:30 in the library. 

Friday Seminar: Incorporating Predictability into Cost Optimization for Ground Delay Programs

Waiting

The Spring semester may be winding up, but we still have Friday Seminars! This week features UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate Yi Liu presenting, "Incorporating Predictability into Cost Optimization for Ground Delay Programs."

When there is foreseen congestion at an airport, Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) are often implemented to balance arrival demand with available arrival capacity by holding inbound flights at their departure airports. Through this, GDPs transfer expensive airborne delay in the terminal airspace of the arrival airport to cheaper and safer ground delay at the departure airports. In the implementation of GDPs, emphasis has mainly been put on maximizing throughput while predictability is overlooked. As a result, planned and unplanned delays are assigned the same cost coefficient in the GDP cost optimization problem. This ignores the fact that unplanned delays require extra effort from both the flight operator side and the traffic manager side and cause more pain for the passengers, which should correspond to higher costs.

This work introduces the goal of predictability into GDP cost optimization under capacity uncertainty. This is accomplished by assigning extra premiums to unplanned delays and planned but un-incurred delay, due to their unpredictability. To estimate delay components in the cost functions, two stochastic GDP models are developed using continuous approximation and deterministic queueing theory: a static no-revision model and a dynamic model considering one GDP revision. The results from the case study show that unpredictability can have a strong impact on GDP decisions. Depending on the value of predictability, the proposed method may reduce system-wide cost by 10%.

The seminar takes place this Friday, May 2, 2014 in 534 Davis from 4-5 PM. Cookie Hour will commence at 3:30 in the library. See you there!

Friday Seminar: Improving Bus Service with a Scalable Dynamic Holding Control

Commuter Warning

This week's Friday Seminar features UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate Juan Argote presenting his research on control methods for transit services in, "Improving Bus Service with a Scalable Dynamic Holding Control":

Service unreliability is widely recognized as one of the main deterrents for travelers to use buses as their mode of transportation. Bus systems are exposed to an adverse feedback loop that generates a tendency for them to fall out of sync. This tendency can be counteracted by the application of control strategies that regulate the motion of the buses. This is well known among transit operators and some research has been devoted to address the issue. However, existing methods that are simple enough to be scalable can only handle headway-based operations of a single line.

This research proposes a scalable control method that applies dynamic holding based on real-time conditions and that allows buses to stay on schedule. A formulation that generalizes dynamic holding control strategies is developed for isolated bus lines. Stability conditions are derived and a quasi-optimal control that requires minimal data is also presented. The performance of this control is validated through simulation. The control is then extended to corridors where multiple bus lines overlap. A real-world case study in San Sebastián, where a system of coordinated on-board devices was deployed, is used to validate the control performance in this type of scenario. Finally, the resilience of the control is assessed considering multiple potential adversities.

The seminar takes place on Friday, April 25 in 534 Davis from 4-5 PM. Cookie Hour will be in the library at 3:30. 

 

Friday Seminar: Reliability-Based Optimization for Maintenance Management in Bridge Networks

Brooklyn Bridge at Night, NYC

This week's Friday Semiar is all about bridge networks. UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate Xiaofei Hu presenter her research with the talk, "Reliability-Based Optimization for Maintenance Management."

Incorporating network configurations in bridge management problems is computationally difficult. Because of the interdependencies among bridges in a network, they have to be analyzed together. Simulation-based numerical optimization techniques adopted in past research are limited to networks of moderate sizes. In this research, a simple framework is developed to determine optimal maintenance plans for large networks with many bridges. The objective is to minimize disruption, specifically, the extra travel distance caused by potential bridge failures over a planning horizon and under a budget constraint. It is conjectured and then verified that the expected increase in vehicle-miles travelled due to failures can be approximated by the sum of expected increases due to individual failures. This allows the network-level problem to be decomposed into single-bridge problems and tackled efficiently. The computational effort increases linearly with the number of bridges.

The seminar takes place this Friday, April 18th, 2014 from 4-5 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour will be in the library at 3:30.
in Bridge Networks

Special Friday Transportation Seminar: Welcome to the Age of Access: Exploring the Sharing Economy and Shared-Use Mobility

Car sharing

This Friday, April 11 is a Special Friday Transportation Seminar. Sponsored by our new University Transportation Center, UC CONNECT, Federal Region 9 And in conjunction with the Transportation Engineering Program Open House. "Welcome to the Age of Access: Exploring the Sharing Economy and Shared-Use Mobility" will be a panel discussion moderated by Professor Susan Shaheen, Co-Director TSRC. Panelists include: Neal Gorenflo, Co-Founder Shareable; Ed Reiskin, Director of Transportation, SFMTA; Shomik Raj Mehndiratta, Lead Transport Specialist, the World Bank, Rick Hutchinson, CEO, City CarShare; Michael Jones, Principal & Founder, Alta Bicycle Share.

A panel of leaders of the sharing economy and shared-use mobility will introduce the burgeoning economy, discuss various forms of shared-use mobility (such as carsharing, public bikesharing, and web-enabled apps) and explore policy issues associated with scaling and with the integration of shared-use mobility services into the transportation landscape (such as privacy, open data, insurance, safety, equity). The discussion will explore the opportunities to be had in developing a robust public-private partnership, the obstacles that must be faced during this process, and the role research can take in informing the creation of policy.

This event, in honor of the launch of our new University Transportation Center, UC CONNECT, will be held in conjunction with Transportation Engineering’s open house welcoming potential graduate students to the program and to the UC Berkeley campus. Faculty, students, new students, and alumni are welcome to join us for this event. A reception will follow.

The special seminar take place this Friday, April 11th, 2014; 3:30 - 5:00 pm in the Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall. (Note: different time and different location!) There is also a reception to follow. Cookie Hour will still happen, but at 3:00 pm in the library. 

Friday Seminar: Transit Oriented Development

Ho Chi Minh City at Dusk

After a brieg hiatus, the Friday Seminars are back! This week's Friday Seminar features Dr. Hien Nguyen, a visiting scholar at the Institute of Urban and Regional Development, speaking on Transit Oriented Development.

Transit Oriented Development (TOD) has been seen as a strategy to accommodate increasing urban populations with reduced impacts on transportation networks and the environment in many cities. It was understood that approaches to build successful TOD differ significantly from place to place, depending upon circumstances such as differences in land development regulations, zoning ordinances, market forces, development opportunities, available transit services, regional economy, etc. Therefore, to build TOD in Ho Chi Minh City where motorcycles are prevalent in traffic flow should apply different approaches. This ongoing research tries to analyze and assess some policies dealing with motorcycles to integrate this highly maneuverable mean of transportation with MRT as well as to find out effective measures to promote pedestrians to/from MRT stations under the existing characteristics of urban form in Ho Chi Minh City.

The seminar is on Friday April 4th, from 4-5 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour will be at 3:30 in the library. 

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