Events

BridgeSF Disrupting Mobility Hackathon

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flickr photo shared by Pedro J. Jiménez under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-ND ) license

The BRIDGE SF 2016 UC Berkeley Hackathon explores how Shared Automated Electric and Connected (SECA) vehicles will impact the way people and goods move within a city. Participants will be asked to define and solve these challenges:

  1. How will SECA vehicles impact residents, commuters and businesses?
  2. Can SECA vehicles better serve the underserved?
  3. Will SECA vehicles lead to greater safety?
  4. What about adapting to new or unpredictable changes including emergencies?
  5. How can multiple shared services work together?
  6. How can multi-modal integration be achieved between various public and private transportation modes?

Bridge SF Logo

Registration

This 48-hour Hackathon is open to university students and professionals. Participants are welcome to join from academia, government, and industry. We invite participants from the U.S. and abroad to attend this event. You can sign-up as a team (2 to 4 people) or register alone. Participants registering alone will be organized into small teams at the start of the event.

Register here! 

Expected Deliverables
Teams should model the impact of SECA vehicles on traffic, the environment, safety, etc. These include EV carsharing, taxis, public transit vehicles, and delivery vehicles taking into account the need for charging solutions.

Your team’s creative output could be in the form of mock-ups, working prototypes, virtual models (animation, video), graphics (renderings, infographics), simulation models, and business and operational models. Participants are welcome to bring any additional hardware, software, or other materials and components to the Hackathon.

Evaluation Criteria
Each team will present their concepts to a panel of expert judges at the end of the Hackathon starting at 2pm Sunday, September 4th. The judges will evaluate your project based on its value-add to the end users including research academics and institutions; developers and planning departments; and to the general public especially in regards to:

  • Improved Travel Times
  • Accessibility (Seniors, Disabled)
  • Economic Benefits (Jobs, Productivity)
  • Scalability, Open Source Design and User Interface
  • Environmental Impact.

Winner of the Hackathon will be awarded a Microsoft BizSpark membership.

Microsoft Logo

Microsoft BizSpark is a global program that helps startups succeed by giving free access to Microsoft Azure cloud services, software and support. BizSpark members receive five Visual Studio Enterprise with MSDN subscriptions, each with a $150 monthly Azure credit. This totals $750/month across all five developers to spend on Azure services. Azure works with Linux and familiar open source technologies such as Ruby, Python, Java and PHP. BizSpark is available to startups that are privately held, less than 5-years-old and earn less than $1M in annual revenue.

They will  also receive tickets to BRIDGE SF's Thought-Leadership Panels on Thursday, September 8th @ the David Brower Center in Berkeley.  Winners will also present at the International Association of Transportation Regulators (IATR) conference Friday, September 23rd in San Francisco.

This event is possible thanks to the generosity of our sponsors.

Platinum Sposnor

IATR Logo

Silver Sponsors

car2go logo  Siemens Logo

Are you interested in sponsoring the event? Here are our sponsorship levels. All help is appreciated. 

Schedule
Saturday, September 3
8:00-9:00am Registration + Breakfast
9:00am-10:00am Opening remarks and introductions,
9:00am-12:00pm Group work, mentoring
12:00-1:00pm Lunch
1:00pm-6:30pm Group work

Sunday, September 4
8:00-9:00am Breakfast
9:00-1:00pm Finalize Projects
1:00-2:00pm Lunch
2:00-5:00pm Presentations and Judging
5:00-6:00pm Awards and closing

Friday ITS Transportation Seminar! Location: A Persistent Framework


flickr photo shared by Ultimate Bart under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license

It's a new school year, and new semester, and a new series of the ITS Transportation Seminars! Kicking things off this week is Jane Macfarlane, Head of Research for HERE. She give a talk on "Location: A Persistent Framework".

Advances in the Internet of Things (IoT), Networking and Connected Car technologies are radically transforming how maps are created and used. Currently, devices are collecting and delivering location data at a scale greater than ever. Although cloud computing provides the computing scale and power required to process these data, new mapping and analytic frameworks are needed to extract useful and actionable knowledge effectively from the data produced by IoT and connected cars. This discussion will provide examples of location data and some of the analytics that HERE uses to transform this data into a higher level understanding of road network dynamics. We will also show how new types of ecosystems are being created by analytics around location data, IoT, and mobility services. Finally, we will discuss how location as a persistent framework will continue to support the very human part of mobility which is Context.

The seminar takes place today, September 4th at 4:00 PM in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building with a reception to follow. Cookie Hour will be at 3:30 PM in the same location.

See you this afternoon!

Modeling network of vehicles in a heterogeneous non-urban environment

USMC-111104-M-YP696-003

Last week's Friday Seminar featured EECS Professor Ruzena Bajcsi and grad student Katie Driggs-Campbell presenting their research on developing driver models to address issues in heterogeneous environments (with autonomous vechiles and human drivers). Their research group has focused on the relationship of the individual driver in the environment around them. Modeling driver behavior is important because driver distraction makes drivers unpredictable and leads to significant safety implications. NHTSA reports in 2013, 424,00 people were involved in distracted driving crashes with 3,154 fatalities. Even with the rapid advances in automated and connected vehicle technology,  Bajcsy forseees heterogeneous environments for at least the next 15 years, so the ability of the models controlled the autonomous vehicles will need to understand potential behaviours of human drivers. To develop the models using control theory, Driggs explained how they used human-in-the-loop driving simulations to better detect different stages of driver distraction and maneuvering. These models can then be used for semiautonomous vehicular control

Stay tuned for this Friday's Seminar, which is the last of the semester. ITS gradstudent Haoyu Chen will present his dissertation research on improving public transit at city-wide scales. 

Monitoring Traffic for Incidents and Extreme Congestion Events


flickr photo shared by canihazit under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-ND ) license

Last week's Friday Seminar welcomed back ITS alumn, now Univeristy of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Assistant Professor, Dan Work. He presented some of his work in the area of monitoring traffic data to better responde to incidents and extreme congestion events. The talk began with focus on how his group uses the app TrafficTurk for low-cost traffic sensing, which has been used in managing big events like homecoming weekend at University of Illinois and the Farm Progress Shows in Decatur, IL (where over 100,000 people flock for the event). He then talked about how he's used this sensing data to more quickly respond to traffic incidents through multiple model particle filtering. He concluded the talk preseting some preliminary results from New York City taxi data (which is shared here as open data) on the congestion in the city following Hurricane Sandy. The data shows that there was not much congestion during evacuation, as there was a system and a plan in place, but that the extreme congestion after the storm shows a need for better post-event planning and coordination. 

You can find more of Work's publications (and source code) here

Dynamic Dispatch for Same-Day Delivery


creative commons licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by (vincent desjardins)

Last week's Friday seminar featured Georgia Tech professor (and ITS Berkeley alum) Alan L. Erera presenting his work in the area of dynamic dispatching for same-day deliveries, focusing on the last mile problem. He briefly mentioned that he would not be discussing drones because they are not as efficient as trucks due to batching (and the new FAA regulations make them even more unfeasible). Erera focused on optimizing delivery dispatch multiple times throughout the day with prediction of when new orders may arrive and how to route the deliveries. Here are his slides so you can experience the talk all over again (without cookies).

Making City-Scale Networks of Connected Vehicles Reality


creative commons licensed ( BY-NC-ND ) flickr photo shared by Roberto Maldeno

Last week's Friday Seminar featured João BarrosAssociate Professor at the University of Porto and CEO of Veniam talking about how he and his team turned public transit into smart city hot spots for Porto. After early attempts to use cellular technology for connected vehicles, which had major bottlenecks in the networks and was cost prohibitive, Barros explored the possibilities of using wi-fi technology to create a city wide mesh network. This builds upon some of Barros' earlier research that looked into the feasibility and impact of VANETs in urban environments

The key to Veniam's success on Porto has been the city's fibre-optic backbone to create wifi hotspots around the city, like bus stops. A combination of wifi and the IEEE 802.11p standard for wireless vehicle communication, and deployment in fleets such as many of the city's taxis and Metro de Porto's fleet, made the city wide mesh network possible. It also made it very cheap to offer free wifi on the entire bus fleet, which has pleased passengers

For the buses, the connectivity can be used for ticketing, navigation, infotainment, and vehicle diagnostics. This has also created a very rich, high definition data set of the fleet's operations which has informed service and route updates. 

The mesh network has also been very effective in tracking operations at Porto de Leixões. Early attempts to track vehicles with cellular technology were hindered by the lack of cell towers in the industrial area and interference from shipping containers. The wifi mesh network has made it possible to track port traffic to improve efficiency and safety. 

Barros hinted that the next wave of innovation could be in the field of wearables. His group had a project that tracked bus driver comfort and stress to better understand their behavior and how it depends on the built environment. 

Safety in Numbers? Peter Jacobsen talks about bicycle and pedestrian safety.


creative commons licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by D Coetzee

Last Friday transportation consultant Peter Jacobsen was the featured speaker of the ITS Berkeley Transportation Seminar. He discussed his reseasrch in bicycle and pedestrian safety captured in his seminal paper, "Safety in Numbers" (Injury Prevention, v.9 no. 3, 2013). One of the questions he raised was how to define safety. Is it reflected in the data (number of incidents) or behavior (which is difficult to tease from that data)? Jacobsen remarked that, "No one swims in shark infested waters." So when people think it is safer to ride their bicycle or walk, they will be more likely to do so - this is the crux of the safety in numbers thesis. Jacobsen's anaylsis showed that if cycling and walking increase by 300%, the individual's risk only increases 50%. This is also why Jacobsen's anlysis shows that cyclists in Upland, CA have 8-times greater risk than cyclists here in Berkeley. He then suggested there needs to be more research into whether or not more bicycles increase safety for pedestrians and vice versa. 

Jacobsen also made an interesting observation that increased pedestrian safety is not tied to behvaior. He related an anecdote about pedestrians in Sacramento who are very alert because they don't expect cars to yield to them, while pedestrians in Berkeley are often more distracted (with their heads in their phones) because they know cars will yield. Their comfort with the situation is reflected in their behavior. Jacobsen also used the iconic crosswalk of Abbey Road as an example of the evolution of street markings for safety. Watch the live stream now to see it in action - flashing crossing lights, zig-zag lane markers, and more to make it safe for crossing. 

He also discussed other papers that had interestesting observations about bicycle/pedestrian safety. One, "For heaven’s sake follow the rules: pedestrians’ behavior in an ultra-orthodox and a non-orthodox city," by Rosenbloom, Nemrodov, and Barkan compares pedestrian compares pedestrian behavior in an ultra-orthodox Israeli city to that in a quite secular city. The other is "Evidence on Why Bike-Friendly Cities Are Safer for All Road Users" by Marshall and Garrick, which investigates if bicycles improve traffic safety for all modes. 

 

Bike/Ped Data, Bike/Ped Planning

Catch up

Here are a couple of Berkeley bike/ped related things to start off your week.

First, this month NCHRP Report 797: Guidebook on Pedestrian and Bicycle Volume Data Collection has been published, which included some Berkeley researchers on the team that compiled the guidebook. You can read about their methodology here

Second, on Saturday 31 January, 2015 from 10:00am to noon the city of Berkeley hosts the Adeline Corridor Redesign Community Meeting at the South Berkeley Senior Center (2992 Ellis Street). Many of the proposed design ideas focus on improving access and safety for pedestrians and cyclists in the area. In 2010, a UC Berkeley Design Studio examined the area, and you can see their designs here. Are they going to be implemented? Time will tell. 

#TranspoTuesday happening in the library

 

Tuesday morning join us for #TranspoTuesday in the library! Share your favourite recent transportation news stories, like a bus stop that could charge electric buses in 3 minutes! There will also be coffee and snacks. See you there. 

Institute of Transportation Studies Friday Seminar: Lane Changing - Mysteries on Behavior and Modelling

Changing lanes

This week's Friday Transportation Seminar is about ellusive lane changing behaviors. Victor Knoop, Assistant Professoor of Transport & Planning at TU Delft will present, "Lane Changing - Mysteries on Behavior and Modelling."

Traffic congestion often is related to lane changes - at a lane drop bottleneck, on ramp, or weaving section. It is therefore essential to have a good description of the lane change maneuvers performed by drivers. Whereas much attention has been given to car-following behavior (how much distance do people keep), lane changing did not get the same amount of attention. This seminar will touch upon three aspects related to lane changing. Firstly, a large-scale data analysis shows that simple concepts of trying to go to a faster lane combined with gap accepting does not provide a satisfactory model. In the seminar outcomes of the data analysis are shown at it is discussed what can be learned from it. Secondly, calibration and validation are required for any model, but there is no standardized method for calibrating lane-change models. It will be shown that the methods have been chosen carefully. Thirdly, the differences in driving strategy between drivers with regard to lane changing are discussed.

The Friday Transportation Seminar takes place on September 19, 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building. Cookie Hour immediately precedes it at 3:30 PM in the same location. (Note: Cookie Hour is not in the library!) There will also be a no-host Happy Hour at LaVal's at 5:00 PM.

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