Parking

Who Pays for Parking?

My parking garage

That's the question asked by a new report from the Sightline Institute. "Who Pays for Parking?" analyses 23 recently completed Seattle-area multi-family housing develops. Some of the findings include: 

  • Apartment developers build more parking than is needed.
  • Many tenents don't own cars.
  • Car-free tenants still pay for parking.

The full report can be download here

Friday Seminar: SFpark: A New Approach to Managing Parking

Parking meters...four/five forms of payment

Today's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features Jay Primus talking about SFpark

SFMTA established SFpark to use new technologies and policies to improve parking in San Francisco. SFpark works by collecting and distributing real-time information about where parking is available so drivers can quickly find open spaces. To help achieve the right level of parking availability, SFpark periodically adjusts meter and garage pricing up and down to match demand. Demand-responsive pricing encourages drivers to park in underused areas and garages, reducing demand in overused areas. Through SFpark, real-time data and demand-responsive pricing work together to readjust parking patterns in the City so that parking is easier to find.

This presentation will be an overview of SFpark, a new approach to managing parking that is being demonstrated in San Francisco. We will run through a deep overview of the project’s planning, implementation, and operation, and touch on lessons learned and relevance for other cities.

The seminar takes place from 4:00-5:00 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour commences at 3:30 in the library. See you then!

Book of the Week: ReThinking A Lot

 

This week's Book of the Week is about parking. Parking lots to be precise. ReThinking A Lot by MIT's Eran Ben-Joseph

There are an estimated 600,000,000 passenger cars in the world, and that number is increasing every day. So too is Earth’s supply of parking spaces. In some cities, parking lots cover more than one-third of the metropolitan footprint. It’s official: we have paved paradise and put up a parking lot. In ReThinking a Lot, Eran Ben-Joseph shares a different vision for parking’s future. Parking lots, he writes, are ripe for transformation. After all, as he points out, their design and function has not been rethought since the 1950s. With this book, Ben-Joseph pushes the parking lot into the twenty-first century.

Parking lots are something everybody has an opinion on. Here's an interview with Ben-Joseph on Marketplace where he discusses the book.  

And of course, you can check out the book from the library

On-Street Parking Regulations Driving Shoppers To Malls?

meters

A recent article from Transportation Research Part A examines how on-street parking regulation has influenced shoppers' behaviour. In "Convenience for the car-borne shopper: Are malls and shopping strips driving customers away?", Vaughn Reimers of Monash University studied shopper preferences related to parking and their perceptions related to parking at malls and shopping districts. 

Global warming, increasing traffic congestion, diminishing resources and declining health levels have led to the introduction of several policies aimed at deterring car-usage. However many such policies have not only often failed to achieve their objective, they also risk jeopardising the retail sector. To help understand why, this study measures the importance shoppers assign to car convenience, their perceptions of shopping malls and shopping strips (also referred to as Main Street or the High Street) in relation to it, and then compares them in their actual provision of it. To achieve these objectives, the study utilised a consumer household survey and a retail audit. The results of the study indicate that consumers regard car convenience as an important determinant of where they choose to shop, and perceive malls as a superior source of it. Moreover, with the sole exception of being able to park close to desired stores, malls offer car-borne shoppers more convenient access and parking. The findings suggest that any strategy designed to deter car usage should be designed to impact equally on both mall shopping and strip shopping, or risk tipping the balance even further in favour of the mall.

Parking regulation and reform is an oft studied field. From the effects of cruising for parking to how pricing influences behavior. Of course more articles about parking pricing can be found in TRID

Parking Minimums: Revisiting an old problem

New York Parking Structure

In today's New York Times, architecture critic Micahel Kimmelman looks at parking requirements for urabn development and he doesn't like how things have been going. 

For big cities like New York it is high time to abandon outmoded zoning codes from the auto-boom days requiring specific ratios of parking spaces per housing unit, or per square foot of retail space. These rules about minimum parking spaces have driven up the costs of apartments for developers and residents, damaged the environment, diverted money that could have gone to mass transit and created a government-mandated cityscape that’s largely unused. We keep adding to the glut of parking lots. Crain’s recently reported on the largely empty garages at new buildings like Avalon Fort Greene, a 42-story luxury tower near downtown Brooklyn, and 80 DeKalb Avenue, up the block, both well occupied, both of which built hundreds of parking spaces to woo tenants. Garages near Yankee Stadium, built over the objections of Bronx neighbors appalled at losing parkland for yet more parking lots, turn out never to be more than 60 percent full, even on game days. The city has lost public space, the developers have lost a fortune.

Streetsblog wonders what this endorsement for eliminating parking minimums might have on the Department of City Planning

This is not a new topic by any means. Donald Shoup's High Cost of Free Parking is a cornerstone of the field. Researchers from NYU have looked at the enforcement of New York City's minumum parking requirements and how proximity to transit affects the reuirements and the impact on housing affordability. There is also a thought that well-functioning off-street parking markets might be a solution. 

Celebrating Parkin(ing) Day 2011!

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World's Park(ing) day in Sofia

Today is Park(ing) Day 2011! Started in 2005, this international event repurposes parking spaces to turn them into mini parks. Oakland is celebrating with 13 parklets, as well as San Jose, Walnut Creek, and Santa Rosa. Check out the map to find the parklet nearest you! The parklet featured above is from Sofia, Bulgaria. You can also follow along via the Park(ing) Day Flickr Pool and #parkingday on Twitter

Friday Seminar - Jay Primus from SF Park

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SFPark on Terry Francois Blvd.

The TRANSOC Friday Seminars kick off this week with Jay Primus of SFPark presenting, "Putting Parking Management Theory into Practice." 

"SFMTA established SFpark to use new technologies and policies to improve parking in San Francisco . . . To help achieve the right level of parking availability, SFpark periodically adjusts meter and garage pricing up and down to match demand. Demand-responsive pricing encourages drivers to park in underused areas and garages, reducing demand in overused areas.  Through SFpark, real-time data and demand-responsive pricing work together to readjust parking patterns in the City so that parking is easier to find."

The seminar will be this Friday, August 26, from 4-5 PM in 406 Davis Hall. Don't miss Cookie Hour before hand in the library. We're baking something special.

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