Statistics

New LibGuide: Transportation Data!


flickr photo shared by Eric Fischer under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license

Have you ever felt overwhelmed looking for transportation data? This new Transportation Data LibGuide should make things a little easier getting started. It provides links to data sources from a number of modes to help you with your research. 

Institute of Transportation Studies Friday Seminar: Large-Network Travel Time Distribution Estimation for Ambulances

Ambulance in Georgetown. BW.

It's almost Friday, so it's almost time for the Friday Transportation Seminar. Remember that this semester the seminars and Cookie Hour are in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Buidling. We also encourage you to follow along (and participate) with the Twitter hashtag #itsberksem

This week's Friday Seminar features Dawn Woodward from Cornell presenting, "Large-Network Travel Time Distribution Estimation for Ambulances."

We present methods to predict the time required for an ambulance to drive to the scene of an emergency. This forecast is critical for deciding how many ambulances should be deployed at a given time, where they should be stationed, and which ambulance should be dispatched to an emergency. Specifically, we predict the distribution of lights-and-sirens ambulance driving time on an arbitrary route in a road network, using automatic vehicle location data and trip information from previous ambulance trips. We train a statistical model using a computationally efficient procedure; challenges include the large size of the network and the lack of trips in the data that follow the route of interest. We demonstrate the operational impact of our methods using data from Toronto Emergency Medical Services, and discuss ongoing efforts to incorporate our methods into a software package used by ambulance services.

The Friday Seminar takes place on September 5, 2014 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining BuildingCookie Hour immediately precedes it at 3:30 PM in the same location. (Note: Cookie Hour is not in the library!) There will be a no-host Happy Hour at LaVal's at 5:00 PM.

Friday Seminar: Anurag Pande presents "Traffic crash patterns: What can we learn from retailers?"

CitiCenter

This week's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features Anurag Pande presenting, "Traffic crash patterns: What can we learn from retailers?"

 Data mining applications are becoming increasingly popular for many applications across a set of very divergent fields. Analysis of crash data is no exception. Association analysis or market basket analysis is used by retailers all over the world to determine which items are purchased together by consumers. It is then applied to stock items (e.g., Salsa and Chips) close to each other. In traffic safety research based on association rule mining, crashes are analyzed as supermarket transactions to detect interdependence among crash characteristics. The results from the analysis include simple rules that indicate which crash characteristics are associated with each other. Results will be presented from two of research articles in which this application is demonstrated using crash data from the state of Florida.

The seminar will be at 4:00pm in 534 Davis Hall as usual. Don't miss Cookie Hour in the library at 3:30!

 

GPS-Based Household Travel Survey from Cincinnati

Cincinnati

A recent TRB blurb pointed to this new study from the Ohio DOT that explores the feasibility of using small, personal GPS devices to conduct household travel surveys, and how  that data is comparable to household travel surveys conducted through questionnaires. They conclude:

The primary conclusion to be drawn from this research is that it is feasible to undertake a GPS-only household travel survey, achieving a high standard of representativeness for the sample, while imputing mode and purpose at a sufficiently accurate level to support modeling work. The high level of accuracy attained in this survey for imputing mode and purpose with 96 percent on mode and around 90 percent on activity (other than detailed breakdowns of the “other” category) is far superior to self-report surveys. The richness of the “ground-truthing” of time, location, distance, speed, and route information from this survey surpasses what can be achieved from any other form of survey.

The final report can be found here.

Infographic: Bicycle Statistics in the US

 

via
 
A nice summary of bicycle ridership in the United States, as well as information pretaining to bicycle related fatalitities in 2008 and investment in bike-ped infrastructure. The Bay Are has done well - San Francisco is ranked Gold for bicycle friendly and Oakland is bronze. (via CFIRE)

Mapping U.S. road accident casualties.

The fine folks at the Guardian Data Blog release a new map today that combines FARS data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and geospatial data from OpenStreetMap. The results, seen above, are a map of every road accident casualty in the U.S. between 2001 and 2009. They released a similar map of UK casualties last week. 

2011 Urban Mobility Report out now!

San Francisco - New Montgomery St.

The 2011 Urban Mobility Report has been released with week from the University Transportation Center for Mobility, a part of the Texas Transportation Insitute at Texas A&M. 

The 2011 Urban Mobility Report builds on previous Urban Mobility Reports with an improved methodology and expanded coverage of the nation’s urban congestion problem and solutions. The links below provide information on long-term congestion trends, the most recent congestion comparisons and a description of many congestion improvement strategies. All of the statistics have been recalculated with the new method to provide a consistent picture of the congestion challenge. As with previous methodology improvements, readers, writers and analysts are cautioned against using congestion data from the 2010 Report. All of the measures, plus a few more, have been updated and included in this report.

You can download the full report here. They also include summary tables for quick analysis and you can access congestion data for your city and even download the data for all 101 cities. A wealth of information to use in your research. Good stuff!

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