Library Closed 12/23/13-1/20/14

Snow Day in Seattle

We're closing for the Winter Break from December 23, 2013 to January 20, 2014. We'll reopen on the first day of the Spring Semester - Tuesday, January 21, 2014 at 1:00 PM. Enjoy your time off and see you after the New Year and the TRB Annual Meeting

New from ITDP: The Bike-Share Planning Guide

Divvy Bike Share Station

Last week the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) dropped a new document about bike-share. The Bike-Share Planning Guide provides an overview of bike-share systems internationally and gives best practices. You can download the whole report here.

Who Pays for Parking?

My parking garage

That's the question asked by a new report from the Sightline Institute. "Who Pays for Parking?" analyses 23 recently completed Seattle-area multi-family housing develops. Some of the findings include: 

  • Apartment developers build more parking than is needed.
  • Many tenents don't own cars.
  • Car-free tenants still pay for parking.

The full report can be download here

Uber to expand into "urban logistics"?

Travis Kalanick, Co-Founder & CEO, Uber @ LeWeb Paris Day 1 2013-2555

Transportation Network Company, or as most people refer to them, rideshare company Uber is looking to expand its market. This week Chief Executive Travis Kalanick spoke a Le Web, where he described the Uber's plans to enter "urban logistics". He said, "Today, we are in the business of delivering cars in five minutes. Once you're in the business of delivering cars in five minutes, there are a lot of things you can deliver in five minutes."

Phase 2 will build upon notable promotions as delivering kittens, ice cream, and Christmas trees

Built Environment Impacts on Individual Mode Choice

Downtown Houston

The built environment has an impact on mode choice. It's a topic ripe for study. In "Built Environment Impacts on Individual Mode Choice: An Empirical Study of the Houston-Galveston Metropolitan Area" by Jae-Su Lee, Jin Nam & Sam-Su Lee examines the built environment and mode choice for the city of Houston, publised in the most recent issues of the International Journal of Sustainable Transportation.

This study examines the impacts of the built environment measures based on two geographic scales, i.e., traffic analysis zone and one quarter-mile buffer on individual mode choice in the Houston metropolitan area. It is confirmed that they have significant impacts on mode choice in varying degrees. The models including the buffer-based measures are more reasonable than those with conventional zone-based variables for both home-based work and other trips. Finally, the elasticity estimates suggest the built environments are undervalued in the conventional transportation practices. Both land use and transport pricing measures should be considered complementary to control the demand for driving.

You can read the whole paper here

Friday Seminar: SFpark: A New Approach to Managing Parking

Parking meters...four/five forms of payment

Today's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features Jay Primus talking about SFpark

SFMTA established SFpark to use new technologies and policies to improve parking in San Francisco. SFpark works by collecting and distributing real-time information about where parking is available so drivers can quickly find open spaces. To help achieve the right level of parking availability, SFpark periodically adjusts meter and garage pricing up and down to match demand. Demand-responsive pricing encourages drivers to park in underused areas and garages, reducing demand in overused areas. Through SFpark, real-time data and demand-responsive pricing work together to readjust parking patterns in the City so that parking is easier to find.

This presentation will be an overview of SFpark, a new approach to managing parking that is being demonstrated in San Francisco. We will run through a deep overview of the project’s planning, implementation, and operation, and touch on lessons learned and relevance for other cities.

The seminar takes place from 4:00-5:00 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour commences at 3:30 in the library. See you then!

Closed 11/27-11/29 for Thanksgiving

Wild turkeys on my bike ride in the Oakland hills.

We will be closed Wednesday November 27 through Friday November 29 for the Thanksgiving holiday. Thanksgiving marks the beginning of the holiday season, which means shifts in travel behavior patterns. 

Happy Thanksgiving! See you on Monday, December 2. 

Friday Seminar: Adaptive Optimization Methods in System-Level Bridge Management

Halsted bridge

This week's TRANSOC Friday Seminar features ITS Berkeley PhD candidate Haotian Liu presenting Adaptive Optimization Methods in System-Level Bridge Management.

An adaptive optimization approach, known as Open-Loop Feedback Control (OLFC), is presented for Maintenance, Repair and Replacement planning of systems of bridge components. The proposed implementation of OLFC in Bridge Management Systems is intended to improve bridge management decision-making and deterioration model learning. The OLFC approach is capable of providing more accurate models than the state-of-the-art methods and yielding system cost-savings over any planning horizon when condition survey data are used to update the bridge component deterioration models. OLFC also enables agencies to consider different model classes when learning deterioration models. To illustrate the desirability of this approach, a planning agency is considered to manage a system of facilities with limited prior knowledge of the deterioration models over a designated planning horizon. OLFC is shown to improve model accuracy and reduce system costs, with a demonstration of how to incorporate system budget constraints when the system is heterogeneous. The discussion is confined to bridge decks, the component of bridge structures that undergoes the fastest deterioration, but the methodology presented in this paper is applicable to all bridge components.

The seminar will take place on Friday November 22, 2013 from 4:00-5:00 PM in 534 Davis. Cookie Hour will be taking place as usual in the library at 3:30 PM. 

Book of the Week: ReThinking A Lot

 

This week's Book of the Week is about parking. Parking lots to be precise. ReThinking A Lot by MIT's Eran Ben-Joseph

There are an estimated 600,000,000 passenger cars in the world, and that number is increasing every day. So too is Earth’s supply of parking spaces. In some cities, parking lots cover more than one-third of the metropolitan footprint. It’s official: we have paved paradise and put up a parking lot. In ReThinking a Lot, Eran Ben-Joseph shares a different vision for parking’s future. Parking lots, he writes, are ripe for transformation. After all, as he points out, their design and function has not been rethought since the 1950s. With this book, Ben-Joseph pushes the parking lot into the twenty-first century.

Parking lots are something everybody has an opinion on. Here's an interview with Ben-Joseph on Marketplace where he discusses the book.  

And of course, you can check out the book from the library

Library Closed for Veterans Day

british cyclists

We'll be closed Monday, November 11 for observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen as regular on Tuesday, November 12 at 1:00 PM. 

Veterans Day commemorates those who have served and began as Armistace Day from World War I. Horses and bicycles were lesser recognized modes of transport during the war. For more stories of bicycles in war, check out this Grist article

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