Toll Roads and Border Politics

I-15 between Nevada and Utah

Last week the Arizona DOT filed an application with FHWA to impose a toll on the 29.4 mile stretch of Interstate 15 within Arizona's border, which links Nevada and Utah. Utah Governor Herbert strongly opposes such a move.

"I strongly oppose any plans to levy tolls on Arizona's portion of I-15, or on any portion of I-15," said Governor Herbert.  "Every state pays into the Highway Trust Fund, and every state receives money from the Highway Trust Fund to maintain the segments of the Interstate Highway System inside their respective borders.  Arizona cannot pick and choose which parts of our national interstate network it wants to maintain.  If Arizona has been negligent in its maintenance of I-15, it should not try and foist its responsibility onto highway users or neighboring states who already pay into the system with their own tax dollars."

Jarrett Walker of Human Transit compares this plan to Virginia's plan put a toll on I-95, one of the state's main corridors, and Arizona's proposal to tax a highway on a remote corner of the state. David King discusses the politics involved of tolling roads at borders, linking to David Levinson, director of the NEXUS research group and Transportationist, and his paper "Taxing Foreigners Living Abroad". (The title is inspired by this Monty Python sketch.)

Any sort of tolling or congestion pricing is inherently fraught with politics. A recent volume of the Transportation Research Record focuses on these issues -  v.2221 Revenue, Finance, and Economics. Equity is also an important factor, and TRB recently published the report Equity of Evolving Transportation Finance Mechanisms, which looks at the equity of evolving transportation finance mechanisms, such as tolling.