On-Street Parking Regulations Driving Shoppers To Malls?

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A recent article from Transportation Research Part A examines how on-street parking regulation has influenced shoppers' behaviour. In "Convenience for the car-borne shopper: Are malls and shopping strips driving customers away?", Vaughn Reimers of Monash University studied shopper preferences related to parking and their perceptions related to parking at malls and shopping districts. 

Global warming, increasing traffic congestion, diminishing resources and declining health levels have led to the introduction of several policies aimed at deterring car-usage. However many such policies have not only often failed to achieve their objective, they also risk jeopardising the retail sector. To help understand why, this study measures the importance shoppers assign to car convenience, their perceptions of shopping malls and shopping strips (also referred to as Main Street or the High Street) in relation to it, and then compares them in their actual provision of it. To achieve these objectives, the study utilised a consumer household survey and a retail audit. The results of the study indicate that consumers regard car convenience as an important determinant of where they choose to shop, and perceive malls as a superior source of it. Moreover, with the sole exception of being able to park close to desired stores, malls offer car-borne shoppers more convenient access and parking. The findings suggest that any strategy designed to deter car usage should be designed to impact equally on both mall shopping and strip shopping, or risk tipping the balance even further in favour of the mall.

Parking regulation and reform is an oft studied field. From the effects of cruising for parking to how pricing influences behavior. Of course more articles about parking pricing can be found in TRID