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Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, Apr 11-12

Wed, 2018-04-11 23:34
Funding state and local transportation projects in California is a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. Changing requirements and shifting political priorities can further complicate the process. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies and local governments risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works on the ground and provides planners, project managers, and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

What You Will Learn

This course focuses on the dynamics of transportation funding as well as knowledge to inform practical grantsmanship. Students develop a better understanding of how the process works in California, including who the players are, how to develop or match a project with a particular funding source(s), and what's on the horizon with regard to funding priorities. Participants will also gain insights into the underlying sources of complexity and uncertainty in transportation funding and finance.

This is not a course on how to prepare a Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) or how to meet specific procedural requirements for a funding program.

Who Should Attend

This course is for transportation planners and project managers in state and local agencies or governments, regional planning agencies, and transit operators. It will also benefit board members, managers, and others involved with developing fundable plans and projects and understanding where transportation funding comes from or how transportation investment choices get made.

Adaptive Traffic Control Systems, Apr 3-12

Tue, 2018-04-10 22:33
This new online course offers summary of fundamental principles, operational requirements and expected benefits of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. The first session presents differences between adaptive and responsive traffic controls and introduces briefly three ATCS deployed in California (ACS Lite, QuicTrac, and SCOOT). The second session addresses InSync, a system with the highest growth in number of deployments over the last few years. The third session presents SynchroGreen, adaptive version of traffic signal software from one of the most respected traffic signal software developers in the US. Finally, the fourth session focuses on SCATS, one of the oldest and widely deployed systems in the entire world. Each session is divided into three major parts: First offers summary of fundamental principles of a selected adaptive technology, second covers summary of operational and institutional requirements to run adaptive control, and the third presents recent case studies with a glimpse on the operational benefits.

What You Will Learn

Students will obtain a significant amount of technical information to understand fundamental principles of operations, deployment requirements, and expected operational benefits (highlighted through exemplary case studies) of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. This information will help students to become familiar with these relatively new signal control technologies and develop a realistic set of expectations regarding their deployments and operational benefits.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for traffic engineers, planners, technicians, and decision makers in municipal, county, and state agencies interested in the operations, requirements and benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control System technologies, particularly those with the responsibility for the planning, design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of traffic signal control systems for urban areas.

Disability and Climate Resilience, Apr 9

Mon, 2018-04-09 23:32
Come join SERC for an important workshop on the intersectionality of disability and climate resilience, something that often gets left out of the conversation when talking about climate change.

Leading this workshop is Alex Ghenis and Marsha Saxton from the World Institute of Disability. Alex is a Policy and Research Specialist at WID. He is currently managing the New Earth Disability (NED) project, which addresses how climate change will affect people with disabilities and how people can prepare. Marsha is a Lecturer of Disability Studies at Cal and a Researcher Director at WID. She is a researcher and educator through the NED project.

During this workshop we will be exploring the connection between climate change and disability: What does it mean for this community, the environment and resilience? We will also discover actions for change: what can we do as individuals with and without disabilities? What opportunities are there for activists and allies?

Visit the Facebook event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1595597207221851/

Food will be provided!

*This event is ADA accessible*

ITS Roundtable: How Do We Finance Transportation Infrastructure, Apr 6

Fri, 2018-04-06 22:33
ITS Roundtable
How Do We Finance Transportation Infrastructure
Friday April 6, 3:30 - 5:00 pm
Reception to follow
Banatao Auditorium, 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

Tilly Chang: Executive Director San Francisco County Transportation Authority
Matthew A. Coogan: Transportation Consultant
Therese McMillan: Chief Planning Officer Los Angeles Metro
Moderator: Professor Susan Shaheen: UC Berkeley, Civil & Environmental
Engineering

How should we finance transportation infrastructure? While many states are experimenting with Road Usage Charging and California passed a gas tax increase in 2017 (SB1), we will need more funding to keep the nation’s infrastructure safe and operational, and address the needs of other modes such as rail, air, and maritime. Furthermore, emerging technologies, such as automated vehicles, need to be integrated into this infrastructure—requiring policy and rights-of-way changes. This panel will explore the challenges and opportunities to financing transportation infrastructure and preparing for the future, including a range of perspectives—federal, state, and local.

Adaptive Traffic Control Systems, Apr 3-12

Thu, 2018-04-05 23:33
This new online course offers summary of fundamental principles, operational requirements and expected benefits of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. The first session presents differences between adaptive and responsive traffic controls and introduces briefly three ATCS deployed in California (ACS Lite, QuicTrac, and SCOOT). The second session addresses InSync, a system with the highest growth in number of deployments over the last few years. The third session presents SynchroGreen, adaptive version of traffic signal software from one of the most respected traffic signal software developers in the US. Finally, the fourth session focuses on SCATS, one of the oldest and widely deployed systems in the entire world. Each session is divided into three major parts: First offers summary of fundamental principles of a selected adaptive technology, second covers summary of operational and institutional requirements to run adaptive control, and the third presents recent case studies with a glimpse on the operational benefits.

What You Will Learn

Students will obtain a significant amount of technical information to understand fundamental principles of operations, deployment requirements, and expected operational benefits (highlighted through exemplary case studies) of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. This information will help students to become familiar with these relatively new signal control technologies and develop a realistic set of expectations regarding their deployments and operational benefits.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for traffic engineers, planners, technicians, and decision makers in municipal, county, and state agencies interested in the operations, requirements and benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control System technologies, particularly those with the responsibility for the planning, design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of traffic signal control systems for urban areas.

Adaptive Traffic Control Systems, Apr 3-12

Tue, 2018-04-03 22:32
This new online course offers summary of fundamental principles, operational requirements and expected benefits of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. The first session presents differences between adaptive and responsive traffic controls and introduces briefly three ATCS deployed in California (ACS Lite, QuicTrac, and SCOOT). The second session addresses InSync, a system with the highest growth in number of deployments over the last few years. The third session presents SynchroGreen, adaptive version of traffic signal software from one of the most respected traffic signal software developers in the US. Finally, the fourth session focuses on SCATS, one of the oldest and widely deployed systems in the entire world. Each session is divided into three major parts: First offers summary of fundamental principles of a selected adaptive technology, second covers summary of operational and institutional requirements to run adaptive control, and the third presents recent case studies with a glimpse on the operational benefits.

What You Will Learn

Students will obtain a significant amount of technical information to understand fundamental principles of operations, deployment requirements, and expected operational benefits (highlighted through exemplary case studies) of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. This information will help students to become familiar with these relatively new signal control technologies and develop a realistic set of expectations regarding their deployments and operational benefits.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for traffic engineers, planners, technicians, and decision makers in municipal, county, and state agencies interested in the operations, requirements and benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control System technologies, particularly those with the responsibility for the planning, design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of traffic signal control systems for urban areas.

Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Methodology for Bridges, Mar 28-29

Thu, 2018-03-29 23:34
California agencies are required to adopt the AASHTO load-and-resistance factor design (LRFD) specifications plus the California Amendments for design of all new bridges.

This 2-day course provides practical training to bridge design engineers and technicians on the application of the AASHTO LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments to the design of concrete bridges that are common in California (cast-in place box girdle, slab, pre-cast, and box culvert bridges).
All structural components of bridges are covered; but retaining walls and the geotechnical design of deep foundations are not. This course emphasizes various technical design aspects that are affected by the newly adopted LRFD bridge design specifications plus the California Amendments, so that a more uniform level of safety for bridges can be achieved.

This course is a hands-on training that combines lectures, class exercises on real-world bridge design problems, class discussions, and Q&A. Various bridge design examples utilizing the new LRFD specifications plus California Amendments are highlighted throughout the training.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for bridge engineers and technicians from California agencies and the private sector, who wish to understand how the LRFD specifications achieve a uniform and accepted level of bridge safety, and how to appropriately use the LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments for bridge design.

Requirements

Students should bring a calculator and pencil for in class problems.

Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Methodology for Bridges, Mar 28-29

Wed, 2018-03-28 22:36
California agencies are required to adopt the AASHTO load-and-resistance factor design (LRFD) specifications plus the California Amendments for design of all new bridges.

This 2-day course provides practical training to bridge design engineers and technicians on the application of the AASHTO LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments to the design of concrete bridges that are common in California (cast-in place box girdle, slab, pre-cast, and box culvert bridges).
All structural components of bridges are covered; but retaining walls and the geotechnical design of deep foundations are not. This course emphasizes various technical design aspects that are affected by the newly adopted LRFD bridge design specifications plus the California Amendments, so that a more uniform level of safety for bridges can be achieved.

This course is a hands-on training that combines lectures, class exercises on real-world bridge design problems, class discussions, and Q&A. Various bridge design examples utilizing the new LRFD specifications plus California Amendments are highlighted throughout the training.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for bridge engineers and technicians from California agencies and the private sector, who wish to understand how the LRFD specifications achieve a uniform and accepted level of bridge safety, and how to appropriately use the LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments for bridge design.

Requirements

Students should bring a calculator and pencil for in class problems.

Towards Vision Zero: Intelligent Intersection Infrastructure to enhance safe operations of (self-driving) cars, Mar 23

Fri, 2018-03-23 23:37
Abstract: Vision Zero plans concentrate on intersections that present a demanding environment. Challenges arise from complex vehicle trajectories; absence of lane markings to guide vehicles; split phases that prevent determining who has the right of way; conflicting vehicle approaches with no line of sight; illegal movements; simultaneous interactions among pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles. Unfortunately, many of the safety-improving tools that are available for practitioners are inadequate to address such challenges, and cannot support a roadway system with zero fatalities. Infrastructure-to-vehicle (I2V) technology based on an intelligent intersection infrastructure can provide the additional information needed to reduce the inherent complexity of intersections and prevent crashes.

Biography: Pravin Varaiya is a Professor of the Graduate School in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology since 2010. He has co-authored four books and 350+ articles. His current research is devoted to transportation networks and electric energy systems. Varaiya has held a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Miller Research Professorship. He has received three honorary doctorates, the Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award, the Field Medal and Bode Lecture Prize of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and the Outstanding Researcher Award from the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of IFAC, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Data Science to Study Macroscopic Dynamics in Urban Traffic Networks, Mar 16

Fri, 2018-03-16 22:34
Abstract: I present a review on research related to the application of big data and information technologies to urban systems. Data sources of interest include but are not limited to: Probe/GPS data, Credit Card Transactions, Traffic and Mobile phone data. Key uses of interest are modeling, adoption of new technologies and traffic performance measurements. In a second part a present multi-city study, we unravel traffic conditions under various conditions of demand and translate it to the travel time of the individual drivers. First, we start with the current conditions, showing that there is a characteristic time that takes to a representative group of commuters to arrive to their destinations once their maximum density has reached. While this time differs from city to city, it can be explained by the ratio of the vehicle miles traveled to their available street capacity. Moreover, we systematically characterize the macroscopic dynamic of the system by increasing volume of cars in the network, keeping the road capacity and the empirical spatial dynamics from origins to destinations unchanged. We identify three states of urban traffic, separated by two distinctive transitions. The first describing the appearance of the first bottle necks, and the second the transition to a complete collapse of the system. The transition to the second state measures the resilience of the various cities and is characterized by a non-equilibrium phase transition.


Bio:
Marta González left Venezuela where she grew up to pursue a PhD in Computational Physics in Stuttgart Universitaet, as a selected fellow of the DAAD, the German agency for students’ exchange. Next, she moved to the U.S. to do a postdoc in the Barabasi Lab and initiated the study of patterns of human mobility with a complex systems’ perspective. She is currently Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley and a Research Scientist at LBNL.

Prior to coming to Berkeley, she was Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT. With support from several companies, cities, and foundations from around the world, her research team developed computational models to analyze digital traces of device-mediated information and estimate the demand on urban infrastructures in relation to energy and mobility. Her recent research uses billions of mobile phone records to understand the emergence of traffic gridlocks and the integration of electric vehicles in the power grid, records of smart meter data to compare policy of solar energy adoption, and credit card transactions to identify habits in spending behavior. Her research has been published in leading journals, including Science, PNAS, Nature, and Physical Review Letters.

Smart Cities: The future of urban infrastructure 2018 Martin Wachs Lecture, Mar 15

Thu, 2018-03-15 23:32
Join us for the Smart Cities: The future of urban infrastructure 2018 Martin Wachs Lecture. The panel this year features former students, post docs and colleagues of Martin Wachs and will focus on the discussion of Smart Cities and the role that urban infrastructure and transportation will have.

Reception - 5:15 PM
Wurster Gallery, UC Berkeley
Lecture - 6:10 PM
112 Wurster Hall, UC Berkeley

Each year the annual Wachs Lecture draws innovative thinkers to the University of California to address today’s most pressing issues in transportation. Created by students to honor Professor Martin Wachs upon his retirement from the University, the lecture rotates between Berkeley and UCLA, the campuses at which Marty taught.

Jeff Morales (Moderator): Former Executive Director of Caltrans; Former Chief Executive Officer of California High Speed Rail Authority; Senior Fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute of Transportation Studies

Ryan Russo: Director of Oakland’s new Department of Transportation; former Deputy Commissioner of Transportation at New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT)

Tom Maguire: Director, Sustainable Streets at San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) and former Assistant Commissioner at NYCDOT

Maria Mehranian: Managing Partner and Chief Financial Officer, Cordoba Corporation

Prof. Susan Shaheen: UC Berkeley, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Co-Director, Transportation Sustainability Research Center

Event Co-Sponsors: Martin Wachs Distinguished Lecture in Transportation Fund, Institute of Transportation Studies UC Berkeley, Global Metropolitan Studies, University of California Transportation Center, Department of City + Regional Planning College of Environmental Design, and Berkeley Infrastructure Initiative of UC Berkeley's Social Science Matrix

A Drive for Better Air Service: How air service imbalances across megaregions integrate air and highway demands, Mar 9

Sat, 2018-03-10 00:32
Abstract: Between 2000 and 2010, newly merged U.S. airlines decreased service to airports in small and mid-sized metropolitan regions, opting to consolidate their operations at high-value airport hubs (passenger transfer points). At this point travelers living in small and mid-sized regions likely began leaking, or abandoning their local airport to take flights from hub airports offering more convenient flight options. The extent of this practice, however, is not well established. I ask to what extent airline consolidation deepened the divide in service levels between airports that are 100–300 miles apart, and estimate the magnitude of air traveler leakage at small and medium airports across the U.S. My estimates suggest that 15.7%–31.8% of the total passengers living proximate to a small or mid-sized airport have the incentive to leak. My estimates range from 10.8% to 33.0% for travelers facing a non-stop itinerary from their local airport and 33.3%–85.1% for travelers facing a connecting itinerary. The potential leaked passengers contribute 1-2.75% of average daily highway traffic at heavily congested portions of the interstate highways connecting airports and up to 10–12% of traffic on low density portions of the highway. This study illustrates the relationship between interregional surface transportation and the aviation system by estimating the number of travelers who may choose to travel long distances by car to access a relatively busier, larger airport with better service. The results of this study help to shape the evolving role of airport managers in controlling demand and delay at major hub airports and in building and managing air service and smaller airports across the U.S.

Bio: Megan S. Ryerson, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the Research Director of the Mobility21 Transportation Research Center, a national University Transportation Center (UTC) and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Ryerson studies the intercity transportation system, and seeks to understand how perturbations to the system – from new technologies like autonomous vehicles to disasters and infrastructure outages – impact traveller choice and mobility, facility congestion, and, more broadly, the local and regional economy and environment. Dr. Ryerson has investigated how airports compete for air service across megaregions, how airlines can reconfigure their disaster planning to achieve more resilient outcomes, and how flights can be planned more proactive to reduce fuel consumption. Dr. Ryerson has published over 30 peer reviewed publications in this area in urban planning and technical transportation journals and is the winner of the 2016 Fred Burggraf Award for the Best Paper in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies. Dr. Ryerson was appointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Aviation Advisory Committee and the Transportation State Transportation Innovation Council. In 2015 Professor Ryerson was named “Woman of the Year” by the Women's Transportation Seminar-Philadelphia Chapter. Dr. Ryerson received her PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010 and her Bachelor’s of Science in Systems Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003.

Owners of the Map: Motorcycle Taxi Drivers, Mobility, and Politics in Bangkok, Mar 8

Thu, 2018-03-08 23:34
On May 19, 2010, the Royal Thai Army deployed tanks, snipers, and war weapons to disperse the thousands of Red Shirts protesters who had taken over the commercial center of Bangkok to demand democratic elections and an end to inequality. Key to this mobilization were motorcycle taxi drivers, who slowed down, filtered, and severed mobility in the area, claiming a prominent role in national politics and ownership over the city and challenging state hegemony. Four years later, on May 20, 2014, the same army general who directed the dispersal staged a coup, unopposed by protesters. How could state power have been so fragile and open to challenge in 2010 and yet so seemingly sturdy only four years later? How could protesters who had once fearlessly resisted military attacks now remain silent? This talk provides answers to these questions—central to contemporary political mobilizations around the globe—through an ethnographic study of motorcycle taxi drivers in Bangkok and advances an analysis of power that focuses not on the sturdiness of hegemony or the ubiquity of everyday resistance but on its potential fragility and the work needed for its maintenance.

Claudio Sopranzetti received his Ph.D. in anthropology from Harvard University in 2013. He is the author of Owners of the Maps: Motorcycle Taxi Drivers, Mobility, and Politics in Bangkok (UC Press, 2017) and Red Journeys: Inside the Thai Red Shirts (University of Washington Press, 2012). He is currently working on an anthropological graphic novel on Thai politics.

CEQA Transportation Impact Analysis under SB-743: Resources, Methods, and Tools, Mar 5-7

Wed, 2018-03-07 23:37
Senate Bill (SB) 743 represents a fundamental shift in the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) transportation impact analysis that has implications for local and regional transportation planning. As required by SB 743, the California Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) has recommended the replacement of vehicle LOS with vehicle miles of travel (VMT) as the new metric for analyzing transportation impacts. So, instead of basing impacts on changes to existing traffic conditions, impacts will be based on how much vehicle travel a project generates. To understand this shift, this course will explore the topics listed below.

What You Will Learn

The course will provide students with approaches for implementing SB 743.
-Various methodologies lead agencies can use to assess project VMT
-How to choose which methodology to apply for a given project
-Modeling tools for quantifying project VMT, VMT thresholds, and VMT reduction from mitigation measures
-How to connect VMT reduction goals to goals for energy, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions reduction,
and transportation.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices.
This is not an introductory course on CEQA or environmental analysis. Training participants are expected to have the requisite knowledge on CEQA and the environmental-analysis professional practice in California.

Science Cafe - Science and Art of Active Transportation Planning, Mar 7

Wed, 2018-03-07 23:37
This science cafe is an informal forum for discussing interesting and relevant scientific issues. We encourage public engagement with science by inviting members of the scientific community to present topics for a casual evening of conversation.

Berkeley is a leading city in promoting walking and biking for transportation. The City recently adopted a new Berkeley Bicycle Plan (2017), laying out a “Low-Stress” Vision Network to promote bicycling. Hear how a process of data collection, public engagement, and analysis led to this vision, as well as the ongoing development of low-stress bikeways such as those included in “Complete Streets” projects on Bancroft Way and Hearst Avenue. Our speaker will also discuss the Berkeley Pedestrian Master Plan (2010) path-breaking demand and safety analysis and forthcoming “Vision Zero” update of this plan, with the ultimate goal of reducing traffic fatalities to zero.

CEQA Transportation Impact Analysis under SB-743: Resources, Methods, and Tools, Mar 5-7

Tue, 2018-03-06 00:34
Senate Bill (SB) 743 represents a fundamental shift in the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) transportation impact analysis that has implications for local and regional transportation planning. As required by SB 743, the California Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) has recommended the replacement of vehicle LOS with vehicle miles of travel (VMT) as the new metric for analyzing transportation impacts. So, instead of basing impacts on changes to existing traffic conditions, impacts will be based on how much vehicle travel a project generates. To understand this shift, this course will explore the topics listed below.

What You Will Learn

The course will provide students with approaches for implementing SB 743.
-Various methodologies lead agencies can use to assess project VMT
-How to choose which methodology to apply for a given project
-Modeling tools for quantifying project VMT, VMT thresholds, and VMT reduction from mitigation measures
-How to connect VMT reduction goals to goals for energy, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions reduction,
and transportation.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices.
This is not an introductory course on CEQA or environmental analysis. Training participants are expected to have the requisite knowledge on CEQA and the environmental-analysis professional practice in California.