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Updated: 15 min ago

College of Engineering Graduate Commencement (Masters and Ph.D.), May 19

15 min ago
This ceremony includes all departments in the College of Engineering.

What civil engineers and planners should know about building infrastructure in the real world: Lessons from Rwanda, Apr 10

Mon, 2020-03-23 16:31
Permanent Secretary for Rwanda’s Ministry of Infrastructure Patricie Uwase will present What civil engineers and planners should know about building infrastructure in the real world: Lessons from Rwanda at the ITS Transportation Seminar and Global Metropolitan Studies Lecture Series at 4 p.m. April 10, 2020 in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building.

Abstract: Over 25 years ago, Rwanda was almost on the brink of being wiped off the world map. Rwanda had just gone through one of the twentieth century’s worst genocides: the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi. This tragedy and the civil war more broadly left the country’s infrastructure completely destroyed. Everything had to be built from scratch. Yet today, the City of Kigali, the capital city of Rwanda is widely known as the cleanest city in Africa. Rwanda, meanwhile, is ranked by the World Bank as the 2nd easiest place to do business in Africa. How can a country undergo such a complete transformation in so little time? What engineering and planning skills are really needed to rebuild a whole nation, at the pace Rwanda has done it?

Engineers, planners, and other actors have played a critical role in Rwanda’s construction process. In this presentation, I will describe their contributions, and highlight broader lessons regarding how world class infrastructure can be built with limited resources, even after complete destruction.

About the Speaker: After completing her master's in civil engineering (transportation engineering) at Cal, in 2015, Patricie returned home in Rwanda to participate in the reconstruction and development of her home country. Since September 2018, she serves as the Permanent Secretary for Rwanda’s Ministry of Infrastructure, which is in charge of building the country’s transportation, energy, water and sanitation as well as housing infrastructures. While at Berkeley, Patricie also took classes in the City and Regional Planning department and interned with the San Francisco County Transportation Authority.

TE Open House Roundtable, Apr 3

Mon, 2020-03-23 16:31
The Institute of Transportation Studies will host a roundtable and panel discussion during the Transportation Engineering Open House in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building at 4 p.m. on April 3, 2020.

Stepping Stones to Sustainable Transportation?, Apr 17

Mon, 2020-03-23 16:31
Stanford University Center for Automotive Research Executive Director Stephen Zoepf will present Stepping Stones to Sustainable Transportation? at the ITS Berkeley Transportation Seminar on April 17, 2020 at 4 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building.

Modeling access and equity in the design of school districts and related transportation decisions, Apr 24

Mon, 2020-03-23 16:31
Northwestern University's Karen Smilowitz will present Modeling access and equity in the design of school districts and related transportation decisions at the ITS Transportaiton Seminar and Global Metropolitan Studies Lecture Series at 4 p.m. March 24, 2020 in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building.

Operations research methods have been used to identify and evaluate solutions to the reconfiguration of public school attendance area boundaries for over fifty years. In broad terms, the school redistricting problem seeks to find capacity-feasible assignments of students in a school district to local schools. This talk will present analysis of the use of operations research for school districting. The talk will feature a review of the literature, exploring connections between evolving issues in public education and advances in optimization, computing and geographic information systems. Much of the early work was motivated by Supreme Court decisions to desegregate schools (Brown v. Board of Education, Brown II, Green v. New Kent, Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg). Around that time, papers appeared in the operations research literature proposing analytical approaches to school desegregation that made use of advances in linear programming. The talk will examine ways in which these papers modeled the trade-offs between achieving racial balance and minimizing travel distance for students, and the extent to which the resulting analysis impacted policy and court cases, with an example from the Bay Area. We will also discuss how the limitations of early models and solution approaches hindered their applicability. The years since have seen new directions in research to address additional challenges related to the design of school attendance boundaries and leverage emerging advances in optimization, computing, and geographic information systems technology. Given declining enrollment in the 1970s and 1980s, many districts closed schools. Again, operations research models were developed to assist in the decision-making. Recent work has focused on economic integration of schools as research continues to show how income level impacts access to high quality education. Trade-offs between providing equitable access to high quality schools and minimizing travel distances to schools are, in many ways, similar to those studied in the early work, but new challenges arise. The talk will end with a reflection of the current discussion around school busing and the ways in which operations research can be part of that discussion.

About the Speaker: Dr. Karen Smilowitz is the James N. and Margie M. Krebs Professor in Industrial Engineering and Management Science at Northwestern University. Dr. Smilowitz is an expert in modeling and solution approaches for logistics and transportation systems in both commercial and non-profit applications, working with transportation providers, logistics specialists and a range of non-profit organizations. Dr. Smilowitz is the founder of the Northwestern Initiative on Humanitarian and Non-Profit Logistics. She has been instrumental in promoting the use of operations research within the humanitarian and non-profit sectors through the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the National Academy of Engineering, as well as various media outlets. Dr. Smilowitz is an Associate Editor for Transportation Science and Operations Research. In 2016, Dr. Smilowitz received the Award for the Advancement of Women in OR/MS from the Women in OR/MS Forum of INFORMS. In 2017, she led the winning team in the INFORMS Innovative Applications of Analytics Award competition for their work on data visualization for mass participation events.

CITRIS Research Exchange - Sarah Kurtz, Mar 18

Thu, 2020-03-12 19:34
Creating Positive Feedback Loops to Accelerate the Energy Transition


About the Talk

Photovoltaic solar electricity has grown much faster than was expected. Continuation of the historical growth rate would enable solar to generate as much electricity as the entire world uses by ~ 2030. California, in particular, has taken a leading role; 19% of electricity generated in 2018 in the state of California was from solar energy. However, growth of solar is now slowing, both worldwide and in California. As the state of California and many others around the world seek to move away from fossil fuels to a zero-carbon energy system, it will be critical to maintain the momentum. Positive feedback has been helpful in the growth of solar so far. This talk will discuss how positive feedback loops can help accelerate the energy transition by taking a balanced approach. The talk will also discuss how choices we make in designing our new energy system can reduce or increase the size of the problem.


About the Speaker

Sarah Kurtz obtained her Ph.D. in 1985 from Harvard University and has worked since then at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in Golden, CO. She is known for her contributions to developing multijunction, GaInP/GaAs solar cells, supporting the Concentrator Photovoltaic (PV) industry, and, more recently, her work with PV performance and reliability. Her work has been recognized with a jointly received Dan David Prize in 2007 and the Cherry Award in 2012. For about a decade before 2017, she managed the PV Reliability Group at NREL and worked to facilitate the growth of the PV industry through improved understanding of the performance and reliability of PV. She has now moved to the University of California Merced, where she is excited about the opportunity to support the state of California in their adoption of renewable energy through research and education.


About CITRIS Research Exchange:

Launched in 2008, CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. CITRIS Research Exchange is free and open to the public. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12 pm and is hosted at the Banatao Auditorium in Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC Berkeley campus unless otherwise noted.

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Live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/live

All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/playlists

Sign up to receive the latest news and updates from CITRIS: http://bit.ly/SubscribeCITRIS

CITRIS Research Exchange - Karina Edmonds, Apr 1

Thu, 2020-03-12 10:31
CITRIS Research Exchange with Karina Edmonds
Google Cloud AI University Lead, Google


About CITRIS Research Exchange:

Launched in 2008, CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. CITRIS Research Exchange is free and open to the public. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12 pm and is hosted at the Banatao Auditorium in Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC Berkeley campus unless otherwise noted.

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Live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/live

All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/playlists

Sign up to receive the latest news and updates from CITRIS: http://bit.ly/SubscribeCITRIS

CITRIS Research Exchange - Solomon Hsiang, Apr 8

Wed, 2020-03-11 13:35
CITRIS Research Exchange with Solomon Hsiang
Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy

About the Speaker

Solomon Hsiang combines data with mathematical models to understand how society and the environment influence one another. In particular, he focuses on how policy can encourage economic development while managing the global climate. His research has been published in Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hsiang earned a BS in Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science and a BS in Urban Studies and Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and he received a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development from Columbia University. He was a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Applied Econometrics at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy at Princeton University. Hsiang is currently the Chancellor's Associate Professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley and a Research Associate at the NBER.


About CITRIS Research Exchange:

Launched in 2008, CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. CITRIS Research Exchange is free and open to the public. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12 pm and is hosted at the Banatao Auditorium in Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC Berkeley campus unless otherwise noted.

-------

Live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/live

All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/playlists

Sign up to receive the latest news and updates from CITRIS: http://bit.ly/SubscribeCITRIS

CITRIS Research Exchange - Stephen Robinson, Mar 11

Wed, 2020-03-11 09:33
CITRIS Research Exchange with Stephen Robinson
Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Davis

About the Speaker

Dr. Stephen (Steve) K. Robinson joined the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering faculty as a full-time professor in Fall 2012, after retiring from NASA. His 36 years of distinguished service at NASA include numerous honors and awards–four shuttle missions, three spacewalks–and extensive expertise in spacecraft systems, space robotics and scientific payload operations. As a research scientist, his areas of interest include turbulence flow physics and modeling, experimental techniques, instrumentation, 3D scientific visualization, applied aerodynamics, safety engineering and applied cognitive psychology.

About CITRIS Research Exchange:

Launched in 2008, CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. CITRIS Research Exchange is free and open to the public. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12 pm and is hosted at the Banatao Auditorium in Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC Berkeley campus unless otherwise noted. Register by the Monday prior to the event to receive lunch.

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Live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/live

All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/playlists

Sign up to receive the latest news and updates from CITRIS: http://bit.ly/SubscribeCITRIS

4th Annual Women in Tech Symposium: Reimagining Cybersecurity For All, Mar 6

Sat, 2020-03-07 00:31
Women in Tech: Reimagining Cybersecurity for All
Friday, March 6, 2020, 9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center, UC Berkeley

About this event:
Data breaches, identity theft, ransomware, deep fakes, doxxing. As digital platforms and tools have become pervasive in our public, professional, and private lives, concern has intensified about the security of our information, institutions, and online identities. The need for innovation in cybersecurity strategies -- from the technical hardware, software, and networks to training the needed workforce -- will drive significant investment and attention for the foreseeable future.

Cyber breaches are projected to cost the global economy $2.1 trillion by 2019, and jobs in information security are projected to grow 37% between 2012 and 2022, much faster than the average for all other occupations. Despite these opportunities, women are vastly underrepresented in the field, holding only 18% of cybersecurity positions. At the same time, women face unique risks and threats of bullying and harassment in the online ecosystem. How can we engage the most inclusive talent pool to tackle the growing challenges, confident that we are mitigating risk, encouraging safe practices, and developing the next generation of cybersecurity professionals?

This public symposium will highlight the experiences and career paths of women in cybersecurity, including those working to advance secure systems within their organizations as well as improve the privacy and security of individual users of online platforms. The event will also feature the WITI@UC Athena Awards recognizing those who have championed the advancement of women in technology.

Who should attend?
We welcome participants from startups, nonprofit and government organizations, and established companies as well as students, staff, and faculty. The symposium is open to everyone, allowing a broader audience the chance to join the conversation and reimagine cybersecurity for all. Attendees will walk away with deep insights about our cybersecurity future, and gain a community of inspiring and motivating people that will champion the advancement of women in technology.

Presented by:
The Women in Technology Initiative at the University of California, CITRIS and the Banatao Institute, and the UC Berkeley College of Engineering.

Sponsored by:
Lam Research, Microsoft, Berkeley Haas Blockchain Initiative, Crowdstrike, Fortinet, Jumio, Sandia National Laboratories UCOP, One IT, 150 Years of Women at Berkeley, Bakar Fellows Program, Berkeley School of Information, Center for Long-term Cybersecurity (CLTC), CyberSN, ISSIP. Additional sponsors to be announced.

For event questions, please contact:
Jill Finlayson, finlayson@berkeley.edu
Emily Sawicki, esawicki@berkeley.edu

Data Assimilation and Optimal Control in the Context of UAV-based Flash Flood Monitoring, Mar 6

Sat, 2020-03-07 00:31
University of Texas Austin's Christian Claudel will present Data Assimilation and Optimal Control in the Context of UAV-based Flash Flood Monitoring at 4 p.m. at the ITS Berkeley Transportation Seminar March 3, 2020.

Abstract: Flash floods are one of the most common natural disasters worldwide, causing thousands of casualties every year. The emergence of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) gives the possibility to monitor these events over large geographical areas. In this talk, we focus on the problem of trajectory planning for a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles sensing flooding conditions. We first use deep-learning to efficiently approximate the flood evolution over time, given external inputs. We then formulate the problem of maximizing the information gained over a finite time horizon, and solve it to determine optimal UAV trajectories. Simulation results show that this approach greatly reduces uncertainty, while being tractable in near real-time on a regular desktop computer.

2020 RISE! Celebrating Women, Community Love and Leadership, Mar 4

Thu, 2020-03-05 00:33
RISE! Celebrating Women, Community Love and Leadership

RISE: Celebrating Women, Community Love and Leadership, is an event for all women to unapologetically celebrate and honor the work and contributions given by women to our communities. RISE is about highlighting the endeavors and efforts of our women leaders, especially queer, trans, Black, brown and indigenous womxn, as well as appreciating, as a community, the daily functioning, striving and travail of all womxn as we give to each others’ lives and rise together.

The event will include dinner and an award ceremony honoring campus and community womxn, as well as performances and speakers throughout.

We welcome all who experience life through the lens of woman in body, spirit, identity - past, present, future, and fluid.

Questions: wonderwomen@berkeley.edu with RISE in the subject line.

For disability-related accommodations, please see access.berkeley.edu

CITRIS Research Exchange - Grace Gu, Mar 4

Thu, 2020-03-05 00:33
CITRIS Research Exchange with Grace Gu
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, UC Berkeley

About CITRIS Research Exchange:

Launched in 2008, CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. CITRIS Research Exchange is free and open to the public. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12 pm and is hosted at the Banatao Auditorium in Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC Berkeley campus unless otherwise noted. Register by the Monday prior to the event to receive lunch.

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Live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/live

All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/playlists

Sign up to receive the latest news and updates from CITRIS: http://bit.ly/SubscribeCITRIS

Human Mobility and Urban Resilience in America’s Cities, Mar 13

Mon, 2020-03-02 13:31
Northeastern University's Ryan Qi Wang will present Human Mobility and Urban Resilience in America’s Cities at 4 p.m. Friday, March 13 at the ITS Transportation Seminar in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building.

Abstract: Mobility, one of the basic human behaviors, is significantly influenced by environmental shocks and
social stresses. In this talk, Wang will present the collaborative work on two interrelated areas:
human movement perturbation under the influence of natural disasters, and mobility equality in
big cities. In the first area, we explore the uniformity and heterogeneity of human movements
under the impact of major natural disasters such as Hurricane Harvey. The exploration will
pave a path to real-time track and response to evacuations and recoveries. In the second
area, we develop a test of neighborhood isolation that leverages fine-grained dynamic data
from Twitter on the everyday movement of residents in America’s 50 largest cities. We find
surprisingly high consistency across neighborhoods of different race and income characteristics
in the metropolitan region; however, we uncover residents of primarily black and Hispanic
neighborhoods are far less exposed to either nonpoor or white middle-class neighborhoods than
residents of primarily white neighborhoods. The studies demonstrate that human mobility is a key
force for, as well as an important consequence of, urban resilience.

About the Speaker: Ryan Qi Wang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and
Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University and the Associate Director of Research
on Social Media at the Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI). He is interested in the interplay
between data science and computational social science. His research focuses on two interrelated
areas: human movement perturbation under the influence of natural and manmade disasters, and
mobility equality in big cities. Before joining in Northeastern, Ryan was a postdoc fellow at the
Department of Sociology, Harvard University. He received my Ph.D. degree from the Department
of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. During his time at Virginia Tech, he was
also the first Ph.D. Fellow at BioBuild, an interdisciplinary program, and a Via Teaching Fellow.
He obtained his M.S. in Construction Management from Michigan State University and B.S. in
Chemical Engineering from Tianjin University (China).

Dynamic Pricing for Toll Lanes, Feb 28

Sat, 2020-02-29 00:31
Global Head of Machine Learning & Science at Amazon Web Services Robert Phillips will present Dynamic Pricing for Toll Lanes on Feb. 28 2020 at 4 p.m. at the ITS Transportation Seminar in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building.

BlaBlaCar: On the road... With a purpose, Feb 27

Fri, 2020-02-28 00:33
Frédéric Mazzella, Founder & Chairman, BlaBlaCar, a European rideshare platform, will present BlaBlaCar: On the road... With a purpose at the ITS Transportation Seminar Thursday, Feb 27, from 1-2 p.m. in 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building.

Abstract
Since its founding in 2006 by Frederic Mazzella, BlaBlaCar has become the world’s leading long-distance carpooling platform – a global, trusted community of 87 million drivers and passengers in 22 countries. The platform connects people looking to travel long distances with drivers heading the same way, so they can travel together and share the cost. With the recent integration of a coach network and a commuter carpooling service, BlaBlaCar aims to become the go-to marketplace for shared mobility. Affordable, convenient, user and eco-friendly, wherever there’s a road, there’s a BlaBlaCar.

Frederic will share the story and perspectives of the company, as well as his view on the state of the European tech ecosystem as co-president of France Digitale, the largest European startup association.

Frédéric Mazzella is the Founder and Chairman of BlaBlaCar the world’s leading carpooling platform with a global, trusted community of 87 million drivers and passengers in 22 countries. Frederic sits on the board of Trivago and Olio an anti food-waste UK-based company. In 2018 Frederic was also elected Co-President of France Digitale, the largest startup association in Europe representing 1500 startups. Frederic holds an MBA. from INSEAD, a Master's degree in Computer Science from Stanford University and a Master's degree in Physics from École Normale Supérieure in Paris. Frederic's topics in international conferences include the fast changing mobility landscape, environmental concerns, entrepreneurship, global marketplaces and building trust in online communities.

Application of Machine Learning Techniques to Aviation Operations: NASA Case Studies, Feb 26

Thu, 2020-02-27 00:30
Abstract: There is an increasing interest in applying methods based on Machine Learning Techniques (MLT) to problems in aviation operations. The current interest is based on developments in Cloud Computing, the availability of open software and the success of MLT in automation, consumer behavior and finance involving large database. Historically aviation operations have been analyzed using physics-based models and provide information for making operational decisions. This talk describes issues to be addressed in applying either model-driven or data-driven methods. Aviation operations involving many decision makers, multiple objectives, poor or unavailable physics-based models, and a rich historical database are prime candidates for analysis using data-driven methods. The issues relating to data, feature selection and validation of the models are illustrated by examining case studies of the application of MLT to problems in air traffic management at NASA. Further research is needed in the application of MLT to critical aviation operations. As always, the best approach depends on the task, the physical understanding of the problem, and the quality and quantity of the available data.

Bio: Dr. Banavar Sridhar is Principal Engineer, University Space Research Association (USRA) at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. He was formerly NASA Senior Scientist for Air Transportation Systems. His research interests are in the application of modeling and optimization techniques to aerospace systems. Dr. Sridhar received the 2004 IEEE Control System Technology Award for his contributions to the development of modeling and simulation techniques. He led the development of traffic flow management software, Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET), which received the NASA Software of the Year Award in 2006 and the FAA Excellence in Aviation Research in 2010. Dr. Sridhar has served on the Editorial Board of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) Journal Control Engineering Practice, International Journal of Machine Vision and Applications, IEEE Control Systems Magazine, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Journal of Robotics Systems Special Issue on Passive Ranging and IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation Special Issue on Perception-Based Real-World Navigation. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the AIAA.

The NASA Berkeley Aviation Data Science Seminar Series was launched in spring 2020 and is held weekly on Wednesdays in Stanley 106, at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, from January 22 through May 6. Presenters include experts in government, industry, and academia, who focus on how big data collection and machine learning are transforming aircraft, airspace, and airport operations, with topics ranging from feedback control, IoT, and IoV to autonomy, AI, and data security. All seminars are livecast and interactive across both campuses. The series is also being offered as a 1-credit course: the Berkeley course numbers are CEE198/CEE298 (class #: 33393) and CP298 (class #: 13328). This seminar series is hosted by NASA and UC Berkeley, sponsored by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and NASA Academic Mission Services; and presented by UC Berkeley's Urban Air Mobility Research Center (UAM@Berkeley), the Berkeley Institute of Transportation Studies, and BIDS.

CITRIS Research Exchange - Jen Schradie, Feb 26

Thu, 2020-02-27 00:30
The Revolution That Wasn’t: How Digital Activism Favors Conservatives

About the Talk:

The internet has been hailed as a leveling force that is reshaping activism. From the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter and #MeToo, digital activism seemed cheap, fast, and open to all. Now this celebratory narrative finds itself competing with an increasingly sinister story as platforms like Facebook and Twitter—once the darlings of digital democracy—are on the defensive for their role in promoting fake news. While hashtag activism captures headlines, conservative digital activism is proving more effective on the ground.

Schradie’s talk, based on her book, The Revolution That Wasn’t, identifies the reasons behind this previously undiagnosed digital-activism gap. Large hierarchical political organizations with professional staff can amplify their digital impact, while horizontally organized volunteer groups tend to be less effective at translating online goodwill into meaningful action. Not only does technology fail to level the playing field, it tilts it further, so that only the most sophisticated and well-funded players can compete. The findings from her southern case U.S. case – from both online quantitative data analysis and offline in-depth ethnographic observations and interviews – have national and even international implications for a growing right-wing populist movement.

About the Speaker:

Jen Schradie is a sociologist and Assistant Professor at the Observatoire sociologique du changement at Sciences Po in Paris. Her work on digital democracy has been featured on CNN and the BBC and in the New Yorker, Washington Post, Newsweek, WIRED, Time, Vox, and Buzzfeed, among other media. She was awarded the Public Sociology Alumni Prize at the University of California, Berkeley, and has directed six documentary films.

About CITRIS Research Exchange:

Launched in 2008, CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. CITRIS Research Exchange is free and open to the public. Each one-hour seminar starts at 12 pm and is hosted at the Banatao Auditorium in Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC Berkeley campus unless otherwise noted. Register by the Monday prior to the event to receive lunch.

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Live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/live

All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/citrisuc/playlists

Sign up to receive the latest news and updates from CITRIS: http://bit.ly/SubscribeCITRIS

Dynamic Disruption Management in Airline Networks under Airport Operating Uncertainty, Feb 24

Tue, 2020-02-25 00:34
Abstract: Operating disruptions result in enormous costs across spatial-temporal networks. For instance, air traffic disruptions result in flight delays, cancellations, passenger misconnections, creating high costs to aviation stakeholders. Businesses often design recovery plans in response to past disruptions while preparing for future disruptions. However, future disruptions often can only be characterized partially and probabilistically. We propose a joint stochastic reactive and proactive approach to disruption management (SRPDM), which optimizes airline disruption recovery given partial and probabilistic forecasts of future congestion at hub airports. disruptions. Ultimately, it aims to mitigate operating costs in spatio-temporal networks through more flexible and robust recovery. We develop an online solution procedure based on look-ahead approximation and sample average approximation, which enables the model’s implementation in short computational times. Leveraging partial and probabilistic estimates of future disruptions can reduce expected recovery costs by 1% to 2%, as compared to a baseline myopic approach based on observed disruptions alone. To evaluate the performance of this model, we introduce a novel lower bound based on penalized information-relaxations, generalizable for time-space networks. We formulate this as a tractable integer program, avoiding the need to enumerate prohibitively large state spaces. The performance bound demonstrates that when improvement is possible, the SDRPM bridges significantly higher gap than could have been estimated using a regret bound. This indicates that networked operations can strongly benefit from even partial and probabilistic forecasts of future disruptions, based on available demand and capacity information.

Bio: Lavanya Marla is an Assistant Professor in Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to her current position, she was a Systems Scientist with the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University; and earned her PhD in Transportation Systems from MIT and Bachelors degree from IIT Madras. Her research interests are in robust and dynamic decision-making under uncertainty and game theoretic analysis for large-scale transportation and logistics systems; combining tools from data-driven optimization, statistics, simulation and machine learning. Her research is funded by an integrative National Science Foundation grant, a Department of Homeland Security cyber-security grant, the Department of Transportation, the US-India 21st Century Knowledge Initiative, the INFORMS Transportation and Logistics Society and aviation companies. Her work has received an Honorable mention for the Anna Valicek award from AGIFORS, a best presentation award from AGIFORS, a KDD Startup Research award, and a Top-10 cited paper recognition from Transportation Research – Part A.