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Updated: 13 min 29 sec ago

School of Public Health's State of the School, Sep 19

13 min 29 sec ago
Dean Bertozzi invites all SPH affiliates to join him for a presentation of topics relevant to the School.

TE-06 California MUTCD Update Workshop, Oct 3

13 min 29 sec ago
Description
Are you aware that California adopted a new CA MUTCD standard (CA MUTCD 2014 Revision 2) in April 2017? This affects how you do your daily work in transportation because it updates or changes the State's traffic control requirements?
Are you aware of your company or public agency's requirements to follow this document related to transportation projects?
Are you wondering how the prior Caltrans Traffic Manual, the California Supplement to the MUTCD, and the most recent Federal MUTCD all relate to each other and to your work?
Do you know the status of some of the more significant changes to the CA MUTCD, such as signal timing parameters, pedestrian and bicycle traffic controls, traffic signs, and speed zones apply?
Would you like to find out how other California practitioners are applying these new standards and guidelines successfully? Would you like to benefit from their real-world, transportation experience in both the public and private sides of the industry, and be able to apply their "lessons learned" to your projects spanning traffic control devices, signage, traffic signals, school zones, pavement markings, and the latest requirements and guidance for these?
Do you want to hear about some of the changes that have been approved for 2017 and some changes that may occur in the future?
If so, you will want to attend this important workshop, which emphasizes application areas of the new CA MUTCD. Learn where your prior California Supplement/Traffic Manual applications still apply or have become outdated. Fully understand where and how California practice differs from Federal practice to be in compliance. Pick-up wide-ranging good practices in applying these standards to new and existing transportation facilities in California. The workshop is a combination of presentations by experts, discussion, and Q&A, so whether you are a seasoned practitioner or completely new to the field, bring your issues and experience to further your knowledge.

Topics Include
Important changes due to the adoption of the CA MUTCD 2014 Revision 2
How the prior California Supplement and Traffic manuals still apply and don't apply
CA versus Federal Differences
Issues encountered by practitioners
All-way STOP application and useful forms
Application of speed zones and the law of the real-world tips
Application of warning signs and key curve advisory standards
Differences between and applications of guide, warning, and regulatory signs
Improperly used signs
Application and recent changes to traffic signal warrants
Traffic signal timing parameters and operations
School area traffic controls devices, recent changes, and application
Common errors by practitioners
Good practices

Who Should Attend
This 1-day workshop will benefit traffic engineers, planners, and technicians who work in the various facets of traffic engineering. The workshop will also benefit other individuals who wish to learn about practical applications of the CA MUTCD to traffic engineering practice. Individuals with or without prior knowledge of the CA MUTCD will benefit.

TE-53 VMT Metrics Application and Analysis for SB 743 Compliance, Nov 2

13 min 29 sec ago
OPR has selected vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) as the preferred metric to comply with Senate Bill 743 (SB 743). The recommended changes to the CEQA Guidelines include a Technical Advisory that provides recommendations about VMT screening, methodology, and thresholds. These recommendations require fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices and have implications for transportation planning as part of general plans and regional transportation plans. This course will explain the technical details of how to address these changes and include detailed step-by-step flow-chart explanations of how to analyze land use projects, transportation projects, land use plans (e.g., general plans), and regional transportation plans under SB 743.

Topics Include
Role of VMT in environmental impact analysis versus transportation planning
VMT estimation and forecasting methods
-Data and models
-Project versus cumulative analysis
-Differences in methods for energy, air quality, GHG, and transportation impacts
-Induced Travel
Role of the ARB's Mobile Source Strategy in establishing substantial evidence for significance thresholds
Role of RTPs and general plans in setting significance thresholds
Mitigation sources, strategies, and limitations

What You Will Learn
Students will obtain a rich set of information to help them navigate SB 743 compliance.
How to estimate and forecast VMT using a variety of methods and what limitations apply.
How to relate VMT reduction goals across technical topic areas including energy, air quality, greenhouse gases, and transportation.
What forms of VMT are most useful in measuring transportation impacts.
What decisions are required to select appropriate thresholds and what constitutes substantial evidence to support these decisions.

Who Should Attend
This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices.

Bikeway Facility Design and Safety Improvement, Jun 7-14

Wed, 2017-06-14 22:37
This new, in-depth class on design of facilities for bicycling addresses both legacy facilities and innovative designs that are being developed within many communities at this time. This course will orient participants with fundamentals and details of bikeway design, ranging from application of traditional designs (bike routes, lanes, paths) to innovative facilities that are growing in popularity, such as separated/protected bikeways and special shared treatments. The course will cover a wide range of subjects ranging from user types and preferences, operator characteristics, to detailed design approaches. The course includes numerous examples of legacy and innovative facilities, including examples from European cities that experience extremely high bicycle usage for all ages and abilities.

The course is developed to meet the training needs of persons charged with preliminary planning, development, or design of high-quality bikeway facilities. It will also be valuable for persons responsible for planning bicycle friendly networks, interested in learning how to deliver quality facilities, or desiring tools to remodel existing facilities to better serve user needs.

Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods and Performance Measures, thru Jun 8

Thu, 2017-06-08 23:32
This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results.

In-Place Asphalt Recycling and Stabilization Strategies, Jun 8

Thu, 2017-06-08 23:32
This is a completely-updated and revamped course on in-place asphalt recycling, which will explore in more detail the most common recycling methods, while providing an insightful look on selecting the most appropriate method and stabilization strategy based on a project's and site's specific characteristics. The soil stabilization portion of the course will expand on Caltrans Highway Design Manual Chapter 614 by providing guidelines on the selection of an appropriate stabilization method, design of stabilized subgrade, and construction considerations. This is a must-take course for local pavement managers who are looking for a more cost-effective alternative to traditional pavement rehabilitation or reconstruction.

Bikeway Facility Design and Safety Improvement, Jun 7-14

Wed, 2017-06-07 22:33
This new, in-depth class on design of facilities for bicycling addresses both legacy facilities and innovative designs that are being developed within many communities at this time. This course will orient participants with fundamentals and details of bikeway design, ranging from application of traditional designs (bike routes, lanes, paths) to innovative facilities that are growing in popularity, such as separated/protected bikeways and special shared treatments. The course will cover a wide range of subjects ranging from user types and preferences, operator characteristics, to detailed design approaches. The course includes numerous examples of legacy and innovative facilities, including examples from European cities that experience extremely high bicycle usage for all ages and abilities.

The course is developed to meet the training needs of persons charged with preliminary planning, development, or design of high-quality bikeway facilities. It will also be valuable for persons responsible for planning bicycle friendly networks, interested in learning how to deliver quality facilities, or desiring tools to remodel existing facilities to better serve user needs.

Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods and Performance Measures, thru Jun 8

Tue, 2017-06-06 23:34
This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results.

Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods and Performance Measures, thru Jun 8

Thu, 2017-06-01 23:31
This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results.

Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods and Performance Measures, thru Jun 8

Tue, 2017-05-30 23:34
This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results.

Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods and Performance Measures, thru Jun 8

Thu, 2017-05-25 23:31
This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results.

Multimodal Transportation Operations: Evaluation Methods and Performance Measures, May 23-Jun 8

Tue, 2017-05-23 22:34
This new online training course provides the fundamentals required to understand, perform, and interpret the results from multimodal operational analysis and performance evaluations. Several of the most commonly used evaluation and analysis methods are presented with real-world examples. The course focuses on how to develop an appropriate set of performance measures to reliably compute the gains in performance to the transportation system (and/or subsystems) attributable to a project, policy, or program of interest. It also covers the data sources and data reliability, analytic (evaluation) methods and their strengths and limitations, and the overall reliability of the analytical results.

HST California, May 22

Mon, 2017-05-22 23:33
This one-day symposium explores the current status and challenges ahead for High Speed Rail in California. Leaders from the California High Speed Rail Authority, academic institutions, and industry provide updates and ample opportunity for discussion and networking.

The Symposium is free to student and faculty, if interested please email registrar@techtransfer.berkeley.edu

Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, May 16-17

Wed, 2017-05-17 22:31
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, May 16-17

Tue, 2017-05-16 23:31
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

The Holy Trinity: Blending Statistics, Machine Learning, and Discrete Choice with Applications to Strategic Bicycle Planning, May 12

Fri, 2017-05-12 23:34
Abstract:
Across all levels of government in the United States (U.S.), transportation and planning agencies have prioritized encouraging bicycle use. However, despite such admirable goals, actually increasing bicycle usage has been a struggle. For instance, the City of San Francisco set a goal in 2010 to increase its 3.5% bicycle mode share to 20% by 2020 (SFMTA, 2012). Unfortunately, given the 2014 bicycle mode share of 4.0% (U.S. Census Bureau, 2015), San Francisco appears unlikely to meet its mode share goals. Similarly, in 1999, Oakland set a goal of increasing it’s 1990 bicycle commute mode share of 1.1% to 4% in 2010 (City of Oakland, 2007). In 2014, Oakland’s bicycle commute share was only 3.1% (U.S. Census Bureau, 2015). While sad, this pattern is common. Many agencies are interested yet unsuccessful in raising their bicycle commute mode shares.

To successfully make planning and investment decisions regarding bicycle infrastructure projects, agencies must accurately judge how much each possible project is expected to increase bicycle ridership. To support this activity, my research aims to improve bicycle demand models. In this talk, I will focus on three flaws of current mode choice models: (1) the exclusion of roadway-level variables (e.g. on-street bicycle infrastructure measures, traffic speeds, etc.), (2) the assumption of “perfectly rational” decision makers, and (3) the issue of class imbalance (i.e. the relatively small numbers of cyclists in household travel surveys). In addressing these issues, I merge traditional discrete choice with recent advances in statistics and machine learning, making use of methods such as parametric link functions, Bayesian decision trees, and Gaussian Process models. In all cases, these methods are modified and theoretically extended for use in a transportation context. Together, the developed techniques increase the policy relevance and accuracy of bicycle demand models in particular, and they advance the field of choice modeling in general.

Bio:
Timothy Brathwaite is a Ph.D. candidate in transportation engineering in the Civil and Environmental Engineering department from the University of California (UC) at Berkeley, working under the supervision of Professor Joan Walker. Motivated by efforts to predict the demand for bicycling under various policy scenarios, Timothy’s research makes methodological improvements to discrete choice models to account for omitted roadway variables, traveler “irrationality,” and the typically low number of cyclists in household travel surveys. He was the UCCONNECT Outstanding Graduate Student of 2017 and a UC Berkeley 2016 Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor. Previously, he received his Master of City Planning and Master of Science in Civil Engineering from UC Berkeley and his Bachelor of Science in Urban Studies and Planning from the University of New Orleans. Professionally, Timothy has worked on the data science team at Lyft, with transportation consulting firms (Fehr and Peers and Cambridge Systematics), with the bicycle facilities program at the City of Oakland, and with the non-profit "Bike Easy" in New Orleans.

Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications, May 10-11

Thu, 2017-05-11 22:34
This two-day course focusing on advanced signal operations topics, will enable you to develop and evaluate performance of two types of traffic signal coordination -- time of day and traffic responsive systems. This course also introduces the advanced traffic adaptive system. For time of day and traffic responsive systems, attendees learn how to determine good timing and coordinated solutions with innovative approaches for managing vehicle queues, turns, and potential gridlock situations, how to find optimal timing solutions, and how to safely accommodate non-motorists. Students will work on signal timing plans using several signals along arterials including freeway interchange signals; assess whether more complex timing solutions offer operational improvements; solve specialized problems such as offset intersections and diamond interchanges; and learn to perform analysis and evaluation of traffic volumes and field checks. The operational concept for traffic adaptive systems will be introduced and results compared with results from the time of day and traffic responsive plans. A basic knowledge of SYNCHRO is helpful.

Multimodal Transportation Impact Analysis, May 9-10

Wed, 2017-05-10 22:36
Recent California legislation, as well as public sentiment, has made it imperative that transportation professionals better understand how to analyze and interpret performance measures related to complete streets and sustainable transportation. This new course provides the basics and practical applications for determining level of service for pedestrians, bicyclists, bus transit users, and auto users. It also provides information on the evolving changes in CEQA (SB 743- Steinberg) that requires determining the vehicle miles of travel (VMT) generated by a project, and the determination of what constitutes a significant impact under the new law (including safety impacts).

This course emphasizes the use of the latest 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010), the Institute of Transportation Engineer's (ITE) new Trip Generation Handbook 3rd edition, and other methods.

This course focuses on urban/suburban streets (non-freeways), with equal emphasis on responsibilities normally under Caltrans' control or local agency control. Applications of analyses include improving transportation project design, preparation of defensible environmental impact reports and project mitigation, and prioritizing facilities for improvement. This course combines instructor presentations with eight interactive engagements to apply the techniques in the real-world, with case studies and applications of the material.

Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications, May 10-11

Wed, 2017-05-10 22:36
This two-day course focusing on advanced signal operations topics, will enable you to develop and evaluate performance of two types of traffic signal coordination -- time of day and traffic responsive systems. This course also introduces the advanced traffic adaptive system. For time of day and traffic responsive systems, attendees learn how to determine good timing and coordinated solutions with innovative approaches for managing vehicle queues, turns, and potential gridlock situations, how to find optimal timing solutions, and how to safely accommodate non-motorists. Students will work on signal timing plans using several signals along arterials including freeway interchange signals; assess whether more complex timing solutions offer operational improvements; solve specialized problems such as offset intersections and diamond interchanges; and learn to perform analysis and evaluation of traffic volumes and field checks. The operational concept for traffic adaptive systems will be introduced and results compared with results from the time of day and traffic responsive plans. A basic knowledge of SYNCHRO is helpful.

Multimodal Transportation Impact Analysis, May 9-10

Tue, 2017-05-09 22:39
Recent California legislation, as well as public sentiment, has made it imperative that transportation professionals better understand how to analyze and interpret performance measures related to complete streets and sustainable transportation. This new course provides the basics and practical applications for determining level of service for pedestrians, bicyclists, bus transit users, and auto users. It also provides information on the evolving changes in CEQA (SB 743- Steinberg) that requires determining the vehicle miles of travel (VMT) generated by a project, and the determination of what constitutes a significant impact under the new law (including safety impacts).

This course emphasizes the use of the latest 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010), the Institute of Transportation Engineer's (ITE) new Trip Generation Handbook 3rd edition, and other methods.

This course focuses on urban/suburban streets (non-freeways), with equal emphasis on responsibilities normally under Caltrans' control or local agency control. Applications of analyses include improving transportation project design, preparation of defensible environmental impact reports and project mitigation, and prioritizing facilities for improvement. This course combines instructor presentations with eight interactive engagements to apply the techniques in the real-world, with case studies and applications of the material.