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Updated: 7 min 43 sec ago

CEQA Transportation Impact Analysis under SB-743: Resources, Methods, and Tools, Mar 5-7

7 min 43 sec ago
Senate Bill (SB) 743 represents a fundamental shift in the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) transportation impact analysis that has implications for local and regional transportation planning. As required by SB 743, the California Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) has recommended the replacement of vehicle LOS with vehicle miles of travel (VMT) as the new metric for analyzing transportation impacts. So, instead of basing impacts on changes to existing traffic conditions, impacts will be based on how much vehicle travel a project generates. To understand this shift, this course will explore the topics listed below.

What You Will Learn

The course will provide students with approaches for implementing SB 743.
-Various methodologies lead agencies can use to assess project VMT
-How to choose which methodology to apply for a given project
-Modeling tools for quantifying project VMT, VMT thresholds, and VMT reduction from mitigation measures
-How to connect VMT reduction goals to goals for energy, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions reduction,
and transportation.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices.
This is not an introductory course on CEQA or environmental analysis. Training participants are expected to have the requisite knowledge on CEQA and the environmental-analysis professional practice in California.

Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Methodology for Bridges, Mar 28-29

7 min 43 sec ago
California agencies are required to adopt the AASHTO load-and-resistance factor design (LRFD) specifications plus the California Amendments for design of all new bridges.

This 2-day course provides practical training to bridge design engineers and technicians on the application of the AASHTO LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments to the design of concrete bridges that are common in California (cast-in place box girdle, slab, pre-cast, and box culvert bridges).
All structural components of bridges are covered; but retaining walls and the geotechnical design of deep foundations are not. This course emphasizes various technical design aspects that are affected by the newly adopted LRFD bridge design specifications plus the California Amendments, so that a more uniform level of safety for bridges can be achieved.

This course is a hands-on training that combines lectures, class exercises on real-world bridge design problems, class discussions, and Q&A. Various bridge design examples utilizing the new LRFD specifications plus California Amendments are highlighted throughout the training.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for bridge engineers and technicians from California agencies and the private sector, who wish to understand how the LRFD specifications achieve a uniform and accepted level of bridge safety, and how to appropriately use the LRFD specifications plus the California Amendments for bridge design.

Requirements

Students should bring a calculator and pencil for in class problems.

Adaptive Traffic Control Systems, Apr 3-12

7 min 43 sec ago
This new online course offers summary of fundamental principles, operational requirements and expected benefits of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. The first session presents differences between adaptive and responsive traffic controls and introduces briefly three ATCS deployed in California (ACS Lite, QuicTrac, and SCOOT). The second session addresses InSync, a system with the highest growth in number of deployments over the last few years. The third session presents SynchroGreen, adaptive version of traffic signal software from one of the most respected traffic signal software developers in the US. Finally, the fourth session focuses on SCATS, one of the oldest and widely deployed systems in the entire world. Each session is divided into three major parts: First offers summary of fundamental principles of a selected adaptive technology, second covers summary of operational and institutional requirements to run adaptive control, and the third presents recent case studies with a glimpse on the operational benefits.

What You Will Learn

Students will obtain a significant amount of technical information to understand fundamental principles of operations, deployment requirements, and expected operational benefits (highlighted through exemplary case studies) of some of the frequently deployed Adaptive Traffic Control Systems. This information will help students to become familiar with these relatively new signal control technologies and develop a realistic set of expectations regarding their deployments and operational benefits.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for traffic engineers, planners, technicians, and decision makers in municipal, county, and state agencies interested in the operations, requirements and benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control System technologies, particularly those with the responsibility for the planning, design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of traffic signal control systems for urban areas.

Traffic Control for Safer Work Zones, Apr 11

7 min 43 sec ago
Traffic Control for Safe Work Zones is designed to keep the workers and public safe during road construction and maintenance, utility work, landscaping and railway maintenance work along roadways in California. This training course is compliant with the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CAMUTCD), Cal-OSHA Sections 1598 & 1599, and California Vehicle Code Section 21400; it also incorporates the latest State and Federal guidelines.

Customization is a key feature of our Work Zone Safety Training program - our course can be tailored to accommodate the needs of crews working on local streets, low volume roads, or high-speed facilities.

Collectively, our team of instructors has over 150 years of work zone related experience. They are all Licensed Professional Engineers who all work for Public Agencies or as Engineering and Liability Consultants. Many of the instructors also are active members of the National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, the Work Area Traffic Control Handbook (WATCH) and the Caltrans 2014 CAMUTCD working team.

Who Should Attend

This training is available to cities, counties, state, and federal agencies, utility companies, and private contractors.

From the CAMUTCD 6B.06:
"Each person whose actions affect Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) zone safety, from the upper-level management through the field workers, should receive training appropriate to the job decisions each individual is required to make. Only those individuals who are trained in proper TTC practices and have a basic understanding of the principles should supervise the selection, placement, and maintenance of TTC devices used for TTC zones and for incident management."

Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, Apr 11-12

7 min 43 sec ago
Funding state and local transportation projects in California is a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. Changing requirements and shifting political priorities can further complicate the process. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies and local governments risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works on the ground and provides planners, project managers, and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

What You Will Learn

This course focuses on the dynamics of transportation funding as well as knowledge to inform practical grantsmanship. Students develop a better understanding of how the process works in California, including who the players are, how to develop or match a project with a particular funding source(s), and what's on the horizon with regard to funding priorities. Participants will also gain insights into the underlying sources of complexity and uncertainty in transportation funding and finance.

This is not a course on how to prepare a Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) or how to meet specific procedural requirements for a funding program.

Who Should Attend

This course is for transportation planners and project managers in state and local agencies or governments, regional planning agencies, and transit operators. It will also benefit board members, managers, and others involved with developing fundable plans and projects and understanding where transportation funding comes from or how transportation investment choices get made.

Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, Apr 17-20

7 min 43 sec ago
This course has provided California's traffic engineers and planners with core training for more than three decades. Contents are regularly updated to reflect current practices and new issues. The course spans the full range of key areas from characteristics of the transportation system, analysis of flow and capacity, traffic operations, traffic control devices, pedestrian/bicycle facilities, to traffic safety and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The course is taught by a team of expert practicing engineers and academics. Each student receives a copy of the best selling 16th Edition of Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering.

What You Will Learn

Students gain a solid, comprehensive understanding of the basic vocabulary, principles, and working concepts of all major areas of traffic engineering as they are practiced today. Students are also introduced to the essential traffic engineering tool kit used to analyze roadway and traffic operations and to develop projects.

Who Should Attend

This course benefits engineers, planners, and technicians who are new to traffic engineering principles and practices. It should be viewed as the introductory course for other advanced classes on focused topics in traffic engineering.

Synchro and SimTraffic V10, May 2-3

7 min 43 sec ago
This two-day course provides beginning to intermediate computer lab training in SYNCHRO / SimTraffic10 software and the recently published 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010) for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists. Working on a real-world project, students will use SYNCHRO to insert an aerial background, insert / modify roadways, input intersection geometrics, multi-modal traffic volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicycles) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections. In addition, students will use Synchro 10 to evaluate and develop optimal signal timing plans that reduce delays, congestion, and fuel consumption, and physical mitigation measures to improve oversaturated levels of service. The seamless integration of Synchro with SimTraffic, a microsimulation software, will be used to evaluate intersection operations and compare the differences between "isolated" Synchro and "network-wide" SimTraffic analysis. This course will also teach you how to review and understand the delay, level of service, and queuing analysis using both empirical analysis (Synchro) and micro-simulation (SimTraffic).

What You Will Learn

Using a real-world project in a computer lab class setting, students will learn how to develop a network and use the SYNCHRO 10 and SimTraffic 10 software. This includes inserting an aerial background, insert / modify straight and curved roadways, inputting intersection geometrics and pocket lengths, volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicyclists) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for traffic engineers, planners, and technicians in both public agencies and private firms who are involved in the planning, operation and management of signal systems.

Improving Safety of Railroad Crossings and Light Rail Systems, May 16-17

7 min 43 sec ago
This new online course takes a look at recent studies on how to improve safety at railroad highway crossings and reduce vehicle-train collisions. The first session will also focus on motorized users, as well as pedestrians and bicyclists who have to cross railroad highway crossings on a regular basis. Information will be shared from recent publications including the Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook and conferences on railroad corridors where speakers addressed railroad crossing safety and discussed some of the topics listed in the course outline. The second session will focus on light rail systems and their impacts on the operation of streets that they have to cross or share with other motorized traffic. The course will address how best to blend motorized and train traffic as well as handle pedestrians that cross light rail tracks on a regular basis so as to minimize conflicts and collisions.

What you will learn

Students will obtain a rich source of technical information to help them select appropriate safety improvement options and make better decisions about how to reduce collisions at railroad-highway grade crossings and light rail systems that operate on public streets in non-exclusive rights of way.

Who should attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, and public safety personnel in municipal, county, and state agencies with responsibility for the design and operation of traffic control devices at or near railroad highway crossings as well as light rail systems that operate on public streets which are shared with other road users. Certified planners who need AICP CM credits will be awarded 4.0 credits for this online training course.

VMT Metrics Application and Analysis for SB 743 Compliance, May 22

7 min 43 sec ago
OPR has selected vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) as the preferred metric to comply with Senate Bill 743 (SB 743). The recommended changes to the CEQA Guidelines include a Technical Advisory that provides recommendations about VMT screening, methodology, and thresholds. These recommendations require fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices and have implications for transportation planning as part of general plans and regional transportation plans. This course will explain the technical details of how to address these changes and include detailed step-by-step flow-chart explanations of how to analyze land use projects, transportation projects, land use plans (e.g., general plans), and regional transportation plans under SB 743.

What You Will Learn

Students will obtain a rich set of information to help them navigate SB 743 compliance.
-How to estimate and forecast VMT using a variety of methods and what limitations apply.
-How to relate VMT reduction goals across technical topic areas including energy, air quality, greenhouse gases, and
transportation.
-What forms of VMT are most useful in measuring transportation impacts.
-What decisions are required to select appropriate thresholds and what constitutes substantial evidence to support these
decisions.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices.

California MUTCD Update Workshop, Jun 14

7 min 43 sec ago
-Are you aware that California adopted a new CA MUTCD standard (CA MUTCD 2014 Revision 2) in
April, 2017. This affects how you do your daily work in transportation because it updates or changes
the State's traffic control requirements?
-Are you aware of your company or public agency's requirements to follow this document related to
transportation projects?
-Are you wondering how the prior Caltrans Traffic Manual, the California Supplement to the MUTCD, and
the most recent Federal MUTCD all relate to each other and to your work?
-Do you know the status of some of the more significant changes to the CA MUTCD, such as signal
timing parameters, pedestrian and bicycle traffic controls, traffic signs, and speed zones apply?
-Would you like to find out how other California practitioners are applying these new standards and
guidelines successfully? Would you like to benefit from their real-world, transportation experience in
both the public and private sides of the industry, and be able to apply their "lessons learned" to your
projects spanning traffic control devices, signage, traffic signals, school zones, pavement markings,
and the latest requirements and guidance for these?
-Do you want to hear about some of the changes that have been approved for 2017 and some changes
that may occur in the future?

If so, you will want to attend this important workshop, which emphasizes application areas of the new CA MUTCD. Learn where your prior California Supplement/Traffic Manual applications still apply or have become outdated. Fully understand where and how California practice differs from Federal practice to be in compliance. Pick-up wide-ranging good practices in applying these standards to new and existing transportation facilities in California. The workshop is a combination of presentations by experts, discussion, and Q&A, so whether you are a seasoned practitioner or completely new to the field, bring your issues and experience to further your knowledge.

Who Should Attend

This 1-day workshop will benefit traffic engineers, planners, and technicians who work in the various facets of traffic engineering. The workshop will also benefit other individuals who wish to learn about practical applications of the CA MUTCD to traffic engineering practice. Individuals with or without prior knowledge of the CA MUTCD will benefit.

Airport Systems Planning and Design, Jul 9-13

7 min 43 sec ago
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

Traffic Control for Safer Work Zones, Feb 27

7 min 43 sec ago
Traffic Control for Safe Work Zones is designed to keep the workers and public safe during road construction and maintenance, utility work, landscaping and railway maintenance work along roadways in California. This training course is compliant with the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CAMUTCD), Cal-OSHA Sections 1598 & 1599, and California Vehicle Code Section 21400; it also incorporates the latest State and Federal guidelines.

Customization is a key feature of our Work Zone Safety Training program - our course can be tailored to accommodate the needs of crews working on local streets, low volume roads, or high-speed facilities.

Collectively, our team of instructors has over 150 years of work zone related experience. They are all Licensed Professional Engineers who all work for Public Agencies or as Engineering and Liability Consultants. Many of the instructors also are active members of the National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, the Work Area Traffic Control Handbook (WATCH) and the Caltrans 2014 CAMUTCD working team.

Who Should Attend:

This training is available to cities, counties, state, and federal agencies, utility companies, and private contractors.
From the CAMUTCD 6B.06:
"Each person whose actions affect Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) zone safety, from the upper-level management through the field workers, should receive training appropriate to the job decisions each individual is required to make. Only those individuals who are trained in proper TTC practices and have a basic understanding of the principles should supervise the selection, placement, and maintenance of TTC devices used for TTC zones and for incident management."

By the end of the training, the student will:

Understand the need and requirements to protect the driving public and work-zone crew at and around work zones.

Gain knowledge concerning actions to reduce risk of personal, agency liability arising from negligence in the work-zone design and operation, and human factors that affect motorists traversing the work zone.

Learn how to use the course handbooks, namely CAMUTCD, WATCH, Flagging Instruction Book and the Temporary Pedestrian Facility Handbook.

Gain knowledge on "bicyclist and pedestrian accommodations" and be able to implement traffic control plans for work zones that are safe for non-motorist.

Learn to develop and or implement traffic control plans for work zones in accordance with the CAMUTCD Standards and Guidance.

Understand safety equipment and markings as well as their uses/limitations under various conditions.

Learn to efficiently install and remove traffic control devices for work zones to assure safety of the driving public and the work-zone crew.

Be able to safely prepare, install and remove a variety of safety equipment and markings used to control/guide traffic safely through work zones.

Learn how to use techniques, devices and equipment to safely direct vehicle movements around work zones in accordance with CAMUTCD

Be able to handle emergency vehicles traveling through the work zone, emergency situations and methods of dealing with hostile drivers.

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction, and Maintenance, Feb 27-Mar 1

7 min 43 sec ago
This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the local agency engineer when dealing with contractors, consultants, and specifications. It is expected that the information presented will be very useful to those that design, specify, and manage asphalt pavements.

What you will learn

By the end of this course, students have a broad understanding of asphalt materials, construction, and proven asphalt pavement maintenance and rehabilitation strategies along with their most appropriate use in an agency's overall pavement management plan.

Who should attend

This course is particularly designed for junior-level engineers in state and local agencies and those new to the pavement field who would benefit from a strong introduction to asphalt pavements. More senior level agency engineers, consultants, contractors, maintenance personnel, and asphalt producers may gain from the class as it covers a wide range of topics in the asphalt pavement field.

Smart Cities: The future of urban infrastructure 2018 Martin Wachs Lecture, Mar 15

7 min 43 sec ago
Join us for the Smart Cities: The future of urban infrastructure 2018 Martin Wachs Lecture. The panel this year features former students, post docs and colleagues of Martin Wachs and will focus on the discussion of Smart Cities and the role that urban infrastructure and transportation will have.

Reception - 5:15 PM
Wurster Gallery, UC Berkeley
Lecture - 6:10 PM
112 Wurster Hall, UC Berkeley

Each year the annual Wachs Lecture draws innovative thinkers to the University of California to address today’s most pressing issues in transportation. Created by students to honor Professor Martin Wachs upon his retirement from the University, the lecture rotates between Berkeley and UCLA, the campuses at which Marty taught.

Jeff Morales (Moderator): Former Executive Director of Caltrans; Former Chief Executive Officer of California High Speed Rail Authority; Senior Fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute of Transportation Studies

Ryan Russo: Director of Oakland’s new Department of Transportation; former Deputy Commissioner of Transportation at New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT)

Tom Maguire: Director, Sustainable Streets at San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) and former Assistant Commissioner at NYCDOT

Maria Mehranian: Managing Partner and Chief Financial Officer, Cordoba Corporation

Prof. Susan Shaheen: UC Berkeley, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Co-Director, Transportation Sustainability Research Center

Event Co-Sponsors: Martin Wachs Distinguished Lecture in Transportation Fund, Institute of Transportation Studies UC Berkeley, Global Metropolitan Studies, University of California Transportation Center, Department of City + Regional Planning College of Environmental Design, and Berkeley Infrastructure Initiative of UC Berkeley's Social Science Matrix

Owners of the Map: Motorcycle Taxi Drivers, Mobility, and Politics in Bangkok, Mar 8

7 min 43 sec ago
On May 19, 2010, the Royal Thai Army deployed tanks, snipers, and war weapons to disperse the thousands of Red Shirts protesters who had taken over the commercial center of Bangkok to demand democratic elections and an end to inequality. Key to this mobilization were motorcycle taxi drivers, who slowed down, filtered, and severed mobility in the area, claiming a prominent role in national politics and ownership over the city and challenging state hegemony. Four years later, on May 20, 2014, the same army general who directed the dispersal staged a coup, unopposed by protesters. How could state power have been so fragile and open to challenge in 2010 and yet so seemingly sturdy only four years later? How could protesters who had once fearlessly resisted military attacks now remain silent? This talk provides answers to these questions—central to contemporary political mobilizations around the globe—through an ethnographic study of motorcycle taxi drivers in Bangkok and advances an analysis of power that focuses not on the sturdiness of hegemony or the ubiquity of everyday resistance but on its potential fragility and the work needed for its maintenance.

Claudio Sopranzetti received his Ph.D. in anthropology from Harvard University in 2013. He is the author of Owners of the Maps: Motorcycle Taxi Drivers, Mobility, and Politics in Bangkok (UC Press, 2017) and Red Journeys: Inside the Thai Red Shirts (University of Washington Press, 2012). He is currently working on an anthropological graphic novel on Thai politics.

Measurable Commute Reduction and the War on SOV, Feb 23

7 min 43 sec ago
Abstract: This talk will cover: SB375’s 15% per capita driving reduction goal, auto-centered Silicon Valley versus transit-centered Helsinki, Proposition 26 (Chevron spent $3.4 backing it) as barrier to protecting the climate, public policy political viability comparison, trip caps, carrot/stick, state bills, city ordinances, and next generation employer commute programs. The talk will take a closer look at the Fair Value Commuting (FVC) carrot/stick policy for standing out for political viability: Stanford University’s sophisticated commute program reduced SOV commuting from 75 to 50 percent, by charging SOV fees and offering incentives toward taking alternative commute modes. The FVC project develops a next generation system that borrows from Stanford’s. Legislation could phase in a $3.00 SOV fee and equivalent incentives, implemented at no cost to employers. System components include enterprise & smartphone apps, incentives/fees, electric scooter/bike, microtransit, and advanced ridesharing. “Fair Value Commuting is a case study for the nation - exceedingly innovative. The self-funding, financially sustainable, unsubsidized business model is unique among the FTA Mobility on Demand Sandbox projects.” – FTA MOD Program Manager Christina Gikakis.

Bio: Cervero-disciple Steve Raney is Joint Venture Silicon Valley’s Smart Mobility Director. Steve’s body of work includes: WayMo autonomous vehicle commercialization plan; Ultra PRT autonomous electric transit; EPA’s Transforming Office Parks study; and ten last mile studies. Steve has five degrees. Recent papers: http://bit.ly/ITSWC_FVC, http://bit.ly/ITSWC_rankPolicies.

Managing Transportation in a New Era of Innovation, Mar 2

7 min 43 sec ago
Abstract: A combination of forces is affecting the development and delivery of infrastructure and transportation services and presenting the industry with new challenges. Forces such as politics, budgetary constraints, organizational and workforce issues, and technology continue to change and require innovative approaches and solutions. With a new and different level of engagement by the private sector in traditional transportation matters, the pace of change is accelerating. What do these changes mean for traditional organizations and programs? What do they need to do to respond? How do the public and private sectors work more effectively to complement each other’s skills and responsibilities? How the interests of the public and private sectors align? What is the role of academia in this changing environment? What skills and attributes does the next generation of transportation professionals need to have to navigate through the challenges and continue progress?

Bio: Jeff Morales has had a diverse career in transportation policy, management, and operations at federal, state and local levels as well as in the private sector. He is recognized for developing innovative policies and practices that have resulted in streamlined processes that improved productivity and customer service across the agencies he has served and advised. He has been at the forefront of work to promote and implement public-private partnerships as a tool for improving the deliver and operate infrastructure. Jeff has worked in the White House, US Senate, and led some of the country’s largest and most complex agencies and programs at the Chicago Transit Authority, California Department of Transportation and the California High-Speed Rail Authority.

A Drive for Better Air Service: How air service imbalances across megaregions integrate air and highway demands, Mar 9

7 min 43 sec ago
Abstract: Between 2000 and 2010, newly merged U.S. airlines decreased service to airports in small and mid-sized metropolitan regions, opting to consolidate their operations at high-value airport hubs (passenger transfer points). At this point travelers living in small and mid-sized regions likely began leaking, or abandoning their local airport to take flights from hub airports offering more convenient flight options. The extent of this practice, however, is not well established. I ask to what extent airline consolidation deepened the divide in service levels between airports that are 100–300 miles apart, and estimate the magnitude of air traveler leakage at small and medium airports across the U.S. My estimates suggest that 15.7%–31.8% of the total passengers living proximate to a small or mid-sized airport have the incentive to leak. My estimates range from 10.8% to 33.0% for travelers facing a non-stop itinerary from their local airport and 33.3%–85.1% for travelers facing a connecting itinerary. The potential leaked passengers contribute 1-2.75% of average daily highway traffic at heavily congested portions of the interstate highways connecting airports and up to 10–12% of traffic on low density portions of the highway. This study illustrates the relationship between interregional surface transportation and the aviation system by estimating the number of travelers who may choose to travel long distances by car to access a relatively busier, larger airport with better service. The results of this study help to shape the evolving role of airport managers in controlling demand and delay at major hub airports and in building and managing air service and smaller airports across the U.S.

Bio: Megan S. Ryerson, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the Research Director of the Mobility21 Transportation Research Center, a national University Transportation Center (UTC) and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Ryerson studies the intercity transportation system, and seeks to understand how perturbations to the system – from new technologies like autonomous vehicles to disasters and infrastructure outages – impact traveller choice and mobility, facility congestion, and, more broadly, the local and regional economy and environment. Dr. Ryerson has investigated how airports compete for air service across megaregions, how airlines can reconfigure their disaster planning to achieve more resilient outcomes, and how flights can be planned more proactive to reduce fuel consumption. Dr. Ryerson has published over 30 peer reviewed publications in this area in urban planning and technical transportation journals and is the winner of the 2016 Fred Burggraf Award for the Best Paper in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies. Dr. Ryerson was appointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Aviation Advisory Committee and the Transportation State Transportation Innovation Council. In 2015 Professor Ryerson was named “Woman of the Year” by the Women's Transportation Seminar-Philadelphia Chapter. Dr. Ryerson received her PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010 and her Bachelor’s of Science in Systems Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003.

Towards Vision Zero: Intelligent Intersection Infrastructure to enhance safe operations of (self-driving) cars, Mar 23

7 min 43 sec ago
Abstract: Vision Zero plans concentrate on intersections that present a demanding environment. Challenges arise from complex vehicle trajectories; absence of lane markings to guide vehicles; split phases that prevent determining who has the right of way; conflicting vehicle approaches with no line of sight; illegal movements; simultaneous interactions among pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles. Unfortunately, many of the safety-improving tools that are available for practitioners are inadequate to address such challenges, and cannot support a roadway system with zero fatalities. Infrastructure-to-vehicle (I2V) technology based on an intelligent intersection infrastructure can provide the additional information needed to reduce the inherent complexity of intersections and prevent crashes.

Biography: Pravin Varaiya is a Professor of the Graduate School in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology since 2010. He has co-authored four books and 350+ articles. His current research is devoted to transportation networks and electric energy systems. Varaiya has held a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Miller Research Professorship. He has received three honorary doctorates, the Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award, the Field Medal and Bode Lecture Prize of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and the Outstanding Researcher Award from the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of IFAC, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Understanding, Utilizing, and Predicting Human Mobility Data
, Apr 13

7 min 43 sec ago
Abstract: Large scale human mobility data can be collected from mobile phones, car navigation systems, location-based applications, social media, Wi-Fi, and traffic cameras. Turning such raw data into knowledge can provide insights in social science, urban problems, and prevention health, and can also benefit applications in transportation, advertisement targeting, and urban planning. In this talk, I would like to share our recent research work in using innovative data mining techniques on human mobility data. First, I would like to present our new semantic annotation techniques on mobility data, which turn raw mobility data into semantic activity space by associating them with surrounding contexts. Next, I will share our recent discovery on connectivity of urban regions through the mobility flows. We propose region representation learning via flows and demonstrate the use of such representations in predicting crimes and region properties. Lastly, I will introduce our new spatial-temporal deep learning models that demonstrate superior performance in predicting taxi demands and traffic volume.

Bio: Dr. Zhenhui (Jessie) Li is Associate Professor of Information Sciences and Technology at the Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining Penn State, she received her PhD degree in Computer Science from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2012, where she was a member of data mining research group. Her research has been focused on mining heterogeneous and large-scale geospatial data with applications in ecology, environment, social science, urban computing, and transportation. She is a passionate interdisciplinary researcher and closely collaborates with social scientists, animal scientists, criminologists, and geoscientists. To learn more, please visit her homepage: https://faculty.ist.psu.edu/jessieli