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Bikeway Facility and Master Planning, Jul 9-18

Mon, 2018-07-16 23:33
This course will orient participants within the bicycle planning discipline, familiarize them with tools and accepted practice, and connect them with essential planning, design, and policy resources. The course will cover concepts, practices, and policies employed by the most bicycle-friendly cities and useful to practitioners to transform an average city into a bike-friendly city. The course is relevant to Planning, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, and Traffic Engineering departments, as well as land use and development consultants. Preparing bicycle master plans will be addressed, particularly California requirements. The course will also introduce participants to the technical toolbox for planning and designing bicycle facilities.

Topics Include
Latest Federal and California state legislation on bicycle planning
Funding and programming for bicycle projects
Integration of bikeway network into multimodal transportation system
Maximizing opportunities for bikeway capital improvement projects
Planning concepts relating to non-motorized transportation
California system of bikeway classification: traditional bikeway facilities, innovative bikeway facilities
Bike-friendly policies and practices and what makes a bike- friendly City
Liability issues related to project design and environmental review
Planning and design frameworks: volume/speed/context, level of traffic stress (LTS), passing environment, travel zones
Specifics of widths, markings and signage by bikeway type
Tools for transforming streets: cross section and "width budget", minimum vs. optimum, width reallocation, parking modifications, roundabouts
Bikes and traffic signals: detection, bike signals, pedestrian hybrid beacons

What You Will Learn
Trainees will gain an understanding of policy at federal and state level to advance accommodation and inclusion of bicycle transportation in broader transportation planning, as well as the place of bicycle policy in California within the larger framework of state policy to reduce GHG emissions from transportation. They will develop basic fluency in concepts and components of bicycle facility design and planning. Trainees will also develop several ways to think of bikeways in terms of their components (widths, markings, signage, signals), context (urban / suburban / rural, motor traffic volume), and user preferences. They will learn about design details and considerations for each bikeway type, tools for transforming streets, and treatment of bicycles in traffic signal control.

Who Should Attend
This class is designed for transportation planners and engineers, land use planners, bicycle program coordinators, consultants, and advocates. Real estate developers may also find the course valuable to understand how to maximize the bicycling potential and minimize undesired impacts of development.

The Clean Energy Transition in Bangladesh - Local and Global Impacts and Opportunities, Nov 1

Mon, 2018-07-16 23:33
The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies at UC Berkeley is honored to welcome Distinguished Professor of Energy in the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley and a former Science Envoy for the State Department, Professor Daniel M. Kammen to deliver the Chowdhury Center Distinguished Lecture for 2018.

Daniel Merson Kammen is the Class of 1935 Distinguished Professor of Energy at the University of California, Berkeley, with parallel appointments in the Energy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the department of Nuclear Engineering. He was appointed the first Environment and Climate Partnership for the Americas (ECPA) Fellow by Secretary of State Hilary R. Clinton in April 2010.

Kammen is the founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL), Co-Director of the Berkeley Institute of the Environment, and Director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center. He has founded or is on the board of over 10 companies, and has served the State of California and US federal government in expert and advisory capacities.

In 2016, he was selected as a U.S. Science Envoy by the United States State Department. He resigned from this position in 2017, citing what he believed to be President Trump's failure to denounce white supremacists and neo-nazis. His August 23, 2017, resignation letter went viral, as netizens noticed that the first letter of each paragraph spelled out I-M-P-E-A-C-H.

Dr. Kammen was educated in physics at Cornell and Harvard, and held postdoctoral positions at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard. He was Assistant Professor and Chair of the Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University before moving to the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Kammen has served as a contributing or coordinating lead author on various reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 1999. The IPCC shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He serves on the Advisory Committee for Energy & Environment for the X-Prize Foundation.

During 2010-2011 Kammen served as the World Bank Group’s Chief Technical Specialist for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency. He was appointed to this newly-created position in October 2010, in which he provided strategic leadership on policy, technical, and operational fronts. The aim is to enhance the operational impact of the Bank’s renewable energy and energy efficiency activities while expanding the institution’s role as an enabler of global dialogue on moving energy development to a cleaner and more sustainable pathway.

He has authored or co-authored 12 books, written more than 300 peer-reviewed journal publications, testified more than 40 times to U.S. state and federal congressional briefings, and has provided various governments with more than 50 technical reports. Dr. Kammen also served for many years on the Technical Review Board of the Global Environment Facility. He is a frequent contributor to or commentator in international news media, including Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Financial Times. Kammen has appeared on 60 Minutes (twice), Nova, Frontline, and hosted the six-part Discovery Channel series Ecopolis. Dr. Kammen is a Permanent Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Physical Society. In the US, he serves on two National Academy of Sciences boards and panels.

Read more about Prof. Kammen HERE.

Established in 2013 the Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies at UC Berkeley champions the study of Bangladesh’s cultures, peoples and history. The first of its kind in the US, the Center’s mission is to create an innovative model combining research, scholarships, the promotion of art and culture, and the building of ties between institutions in Bangladesh and the University of California.

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PARKING INFORMATION
Please note that parking is not always easily available in Berkeley. Take public transportation if possible or arrive early to secure your spot.

EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Airport Systems Planning and Design, Jul 9-13

Fri, 2018-07-13 23:31
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

Airport Systems Planning and Design, Jul 9-13

Thu, 2018-07-12 23:34
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

Airport Systems Planning and Design, Jul 9-13

Wed, 2018-07-11 23:33
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

Bikeway Facility and Master Planning, Jul 9-18

Wed, 2018-07-11 23:33
This course will orient participants within the bicycle planning discipline, familiarize them with tools and accepted practice, and connect them with essential planning, design, and policy resources. The course will cover concepts, practices, and policies employed by the most bicycle-friendly cities and useful to practitioners to transform an average city into a bike-friendly city. The course is relevant to Planning, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, and Traffic Engineering departments, as well as land use and development consultants. Preparing bicycle master plans will be addressed, particularly California requirements. The course will also introduce participants to the technical toolbox for planning and designing bicycle facilities.

Topics Include
Latest Federal and California state legislation on bicycle planning
Funding and programming for bicycle projects
Integration of bikeway network into multimodal transportation system
Maximizing opportunities for bikeway capital improvement projects
Planning concepts relating to non-motorized transportation
California system of bikeway classification: traditional bikeway facilities, innovative bikeway facilities
Bike-friendly policies and practices and what makes a bike- friendly City
Liability issues related to project design and environmental review
Planning and design frameworks: volume/speed/context, level of traffic stress (LTS), passing environment, travel zones
Specifics of widths, markings and signage by bikeway type
Tools for transforming streets: cross section and "width budget", minimum vs. optimum, width reallocation, parking modifications, roundabouts
Bikes and traffic signals: detection, bike signals, pedestrian hybrid beacons

What You Will Learn
Trainees will gain an understanding of policy at federal and state level to advance accommodation and inclusion of bicycle transportation in broader transportation planning, as well as the place of bicycle policy in California within the larger framework of state policy to reduce GHG emissions from transportation. They will develop basic fluency in concepts and components of bicycle facility design and planning. Trainees will also develop several ways to think of bikeways in terms of their components (widths, markings, signage, signals), context (urban / suburban / rural, motor traffic volume), and user preferences. They will learn about design details and considerations for each bikeway type, tools for transforming streets, and treatment of bicycles in traffic signal control.

Who Should Attend
This class is designed for transportation planners and engineers, land use planners, bicycle program coordinators, consultants, and advocates. Real estate developers may also find the course valuable to understand how to maximize the bicycling potential and minimize undesired impacts of development.

Airport Systems Planning and Design, Jul 9-13

Tue, 2018-07-10 22:34
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

Bikeway Facility and Master Planning, Jul 9-18

Mon, 2018-07-09 23:33
This course will orient participants within the bicycle planning discipline, familiarize them with tools and accepted practice, and connect them with essential planning, design, and policy resources. The course will cover concepts, practices, and policies employed by the most bicycle-friendly cities and useful to practitioners to transform an average city into a bike-friendly city. The course is relevant to Planning, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, and Traffic Engineering departments, as well as land use and development consultants. Preparing bicycle master plans will be addressed, particularly California requirements. The course will also introduce participants to the technical toolbox for planning and designing bicycle facilities.

Topics Include
Latest Federal and California state legislation on bicycle planning
Funding and programming for bicycle projects
Integration of bikeway network into multimodal transportation system
Maximizing opportunities for bikeway capital improvement projects
Planning concepts relating to non-motorized transportation
California system of bikeway classification: traditional bikeway facilities, innovative bikeway facilities
Bike-friendly policies and practices and what makes a bike- friendly City
Liability issues related to project design and environmental review
Planning and design frameworks: volume/speed/context, level of traffic stress (LTS), passing environment, travel zones
Specifics of widths, markings and signage by bikeway type
Tools for transforming streets: cross section and "width budget", minimum vs. optimum, width reallocation, parking modifications, roundabouts
Bikes and traffic signals: detection, bike signals, pedestrian hybrid beacons

What You Will Learn
Trainees will gain an understanding of policy at federal and state level to advance accommodation and inclusion of bicycle transportation in broader transportation planning, as well as the place of bicycle policy in California within the larger framework of state policy to reduce GHG emissions from transportation. They will develop basic fluency in concepts and components of bicycle facility design and planning. Trainees will also develop several ways to think of bikeways in terms of their components (widths, markings, signage, signals), context (urban / suburban / rural, motor traffic volume), and user preferences. They will learn about design details and considerations for each bikeway type, tools for transforming streets, and treatment of bicycles in traffic signal control.

Who Should Attend
This class is designed for transportation planners and engineers, land use planners, bicycle program coordinators, consultants, and advocates. Real estate developers may also find the course valuable to understand how to maximize the bicycling potential and minimize undesired impacts of development.

Airport Systems Planning and Design, Jul 9-13

Mon, 2018-07-09 23:33
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR).

This five-day course offers an overview of airport planning and design for those entering or wishing to become more familiar with the field, as well as an opportunity for those with more experience to expand their knowledge of specific topics. The course is taught by some of the leading practitioners (and most experienced instructors) in the industry. In addition to covering the fundamentals of airport planning and design, the course presents emerging issues and the latest trends facing airport planners, operators, and consultants in the US and around the world. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Topics covered also include airfield design, passenger terminal planning, airport ground access, and air cargo facilities planning.

Intended Audience

This course in intended for engineers and planners working for airport authorities, consultants, and government agencies, as well as airport and airline management personnel interested in the technical considerations that need to be taken into account in planning airport development. It will also be of interest to those involved in teaching transportation engineering courses or undertaking research on airport-related topics.

California MUTCD Update Workshop, Jun 14

Thu, 2018-06-14 22:33
-Are you aware that California adopted a new CA MUTCD standard (CA MUTCD 2014 Revision 2) in
April, 2017. This affects how you do your daily work in transportation because it updates or changes
the State's traffic control requirements?
-Are you aware of your company or public agency's requirements to follow this document related to
transportation projects?
-Are you wondering how the prior Caltrans Traffic Manual, the California Supplement to the MUTCD, and
the most recent Federal MUTCD all relate to each other and to your work?
-Do you know the status of some of the more significant changes to the CA MUTCD, such as signal
timing parameters, pedestrian and bicycle traffic controls, traffic signs, and speed zones apply?
-Would you like to find out how other California practitioners are applying these new standards and
guidelines successfully? Would you like to benefit from their real-world, transportation experience in
both the public and private sides of the industry, and be able to apply their "lessons learned" to your
projects spanning traffic control devices, signage, traffic signals, school zones, pavement markings,
and the latest requirements and guidance for these?
-Do you want to hear about some of the changes that have been approved for 2017 and some changes
that may occur in the future?

If so, you will want to attend this important workshop, which emphasizes application areas of the new CA MUTCD. Learn where your prior California Supplement/Traffic Manual applications still apply or have become outdated. Fully understand where and how California practice differs from Federal practice to be in compliance. Pick-up wide-ranging good practices in applying these standards to new and existing transportation facilities in California. The workshop is a combination of presentations by experts, discussion, and Q&A, so whether you are a seasoned practitioner or completely new to the field, bring your issues and experience to further your knowledge.

Who Should Attend

This 1-day workshop will benefit traffic engineers, planners, and technicians who work in the various facets of traffic engineering. The workshop will also benefit other individuals who wish to learn about practical applications of the CA MUTCD to traffic engineering practice. Individuals with or without prior knowledge of the CA MUTCD will benefit.

Improving Safety of Railroad Crossings and Light Rail Systems, May 16-24

Thu, 2018-05-24 23:35
This new online course takes a look at recent studies on how to improve safety at railroad highway crossings and reduce vehicle-train collisions. The first session will also focus on motorized users, as well as pedestrians and bicyclists who have to cross railroad highway crossings on a regular basis. Information will be shared from recent publications including the Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook and conferences on railroad corridors where speakers addressed railroad crossing safety and discussed some of the topics listed in the course outline. The second session will focus on light rail systems and their impacts on the operation of streets that they have to cross or share with other motorized traffic. The course will address how best to blend motorized and train traffic as well as handle pedestrians that cross light rail tracks on a regular basis so as to minimize conflicts and collisions.

What you will learn

Students will obtain a rich source of technical information to help them select appropriate safety improvement options and make better decisions about how to reduce collisions at railroad-highway grade crossings and light rail systems that operate on public streets in non-exclusive rights of way.

Who should attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, and public safety personnel in municipal, county, and state agencies with responsibility for the design and operation of traffic control devices at or near railroad highway crossings as well as light rail systems that operate on public streets which are shared with other road users. Certified planners who need AICP CM credits will be awarded 4.0 credits for this online training course.

VMT Metrics Application and Analysis for SB 743 Compliance, May 22

Tue, 2018-05-22 22:36
OPR has selected vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) as the preferred metric to comply with Senate Bill 743 (SB 743). The recommended changes to the CEQA Guidelines include a Technical Advisory that provides recommendations about VMT screening, methodology, and thresholds. These recommendations require fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices and have implications for transportation planning as part of general plans and regional transportation plans. This course will explain the technical details of how to address these changes and include detailed step-by-step flow-chart explanations of how to analyze land use projects, transportation projects, land use plans (e.g., general plans), and regional transportation plans under SB 743.

What You Will Learn

Students will obtain a rich set of information to help them navigate SB 743 compliance.
-How to estimate and forecast VMT using a variety of methods and what limitations apply.
-How to relate VMT reduction goals across technical topic areas including energy, air quality, greenhouse gases, and
transportation.
-What forms of VMT are most useful in measuring transportation impacts.
-What decisions are required to select appropriate thresholds and what constitutes substantial evidence to support these
decisions.

Who Should Attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, policy analysts, and CEQA practitioners, among others, in private or public practice who want to understand the technical details associated with SB 743 implementation and the fundamental changes in current transportation impact analysis practices.

Improving Safety of Railroad Crossings and Light Rail Systems, May 16-24

Wed, 2018-05-16 22:35
This new online course takes a look at recent studies on how to improve safety at railroad highway crossings and reduce vehicle-train collisions. The first session will also focus on motorized users, as well as pedestrians and bicyclists who have to cross railroad highway crossings on a regular basis. Information will be shared from recent publications including the Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook and conferences on railroad corridors where speakers addressed railroad crossing safety and discussed some of the topics listed in the course outline. The second session will focus on light rail systems and their impacts on the operation of streets that they have to cross or share with other motorized traffic. The course will address how best to blend motorized and train traffic as well as handle pedestrians that cross light rail tracks on a regular basis so as to minimize conflicts and collisions.

What you will learn

Students will obtain a rich source of technical information to help them select appropriate safety improvement options and make better decisions about how to reduce collisions at railroad-highway grade crossings and light rail systems that operate on public streets in non-exclusive rights of way.

Who should attend

This course is intended for planners, engineers, and public safety personnel in municipal, county, and state agencies with responsibility for the design and operation of traffic control devices at or near railroad highway crossings as well as light rail systems that operate on public streets which are shared with other road users. Certified planners who need AICP CM credits will be awarded 4.0 credits for this online training course.

Synchro and SimTraffic V10, May 2-3

Thu, 2018-05-03 23:33
This two-day course provides beginning to intermediate computer lab training in SYNCHRO / SimTraffic10 software and the recently published 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010) for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists. Working on a real-world project, students will use SYNCHRO to insert an aerial background, insert / modify roadways, input intersection geometrics, multi-modal traffic volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicycles) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections. In addition, students will use Synchro 10 to evaluate and develop optimal signal timing plans that reduce delays, congestion, and fuel consumption, and physical mitigation measures to improve oversaturated levels of service. The seamless integration of Synchro with SimTraffic, a microsimulation software, will be used to evaluate intersection operations and compare the differences between "isolated" Synchro and "network-wide" SimTraffic analysis. This course will also teach you how to review and understand the delay, level of service, and queuing analysis using both empirical analysis (Synchro) and micro-simulation (SimTraffic).

What You Will Learn

Using a real-world project in a computer lab class setting, students will learn how to develop a network and use the SYNCHRO 10 and SimTraffic 10 software. This includes inserting an aerial background, insert / modify straight and curved roadways, inputting intersection geometrics and pocket lengths, volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicyclists) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for traffic engineers, planners, and technicians in both public agencies and private firms who are involved in the planning, operation and management of signal systems.

Synchro and SimTraffic V10, May 2-3

Wed, 2018-05-02 22:34
This two-day course provides beginning to intermediate computer lab training in SYNCHRO / SimTraffic10 software and the recently published 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010) for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists. Working on a real-world project, students will use SYNCHRO to insert an aerial background, insert / modify roadways, input intersection geometrics, multi-modal traffic volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicycles) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections. In addition, students will use Synchro 10 to evaluate and develop optimal signal timing plans that reduce delays, congestion, and fuel consumption, and physical mitigation measures to improve oversaturated levels of service. The seamless integration of Synchro with SimTraffic, a microsimulation software, will be used to evaluate intersection operations and compare the differences between "isolated" Synchro and "network-wide" SimTraffic analysis. This course will also teach you how to review and understand the delay, level of service, and queuing analysis using both empirical analysis (Synchro) and micro-simulation (SimTraffic).

What You Will Learn

Using a real-world project in a computer lab class setting, students will learn how to develop a network and use the SYNCHRO 10 and SimTraffic 10 software. This includes inserting an aerial background, insert / modify straight and curved roadways, inputting intersection geometrics and pocket lengths, volumes (cars, trucks, peds, and bicyclists) and signal timings to perform capacity analysis for signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections.

Who Should Attend

This course is designed for traffic engineers, planners, and technicians in both public agencies and private firms who are involved in the planning, operation and management of signal systems.

Stochastic Modeling of Traffic Dynamics, Apr 27

Fri, 2018-04-27 23:32
Abstract: Stochastic models of traffic flow are used in a variety of applications, e.g., traffic state estimation, travel time reliability, and traffic control. This talk will present techniques used to develop stochastic models. A main source of uncertainty in traffic dynamics is heterogeneity among drivers. This is captured using parametric uncertainty, resulting in stochastic microscopic models. These, in turn, are used to develop probabilistic traffic relations and stochastic Lagrangian models of traffic dynamics. Applications of the stochastic models, namely data assimilation, are presented.


Bio: Saif Jabari is an Assistant Professor of Civil and Urban Engineering at New York University in Abu Dhabi. His research interests lie at the interface between data analysis and theoretical traffic flow modeling. One of the main themes of his research is the development of methods for understanding and quantifying uncertainty in transportation systems. His recent work has focused on the development of real-time traffic analytics, including traffic state estimation, network-wide real-time dynamic control, and incident detection, localization, and sensor placement problems for urban traffic networks. Prior to joining NYUAD, Jabari was a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Mathematical Sciences and Analytics Department at the IBM Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Jabari received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities and his B.Sc. degree in Civil Engineering from in the University of Jordan.

Pictures of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity in the San Francisco Bay Area, Apr 26

Thu, 2018-04-26 22:33
The San Francisco Bay Area is currently the jewel in the crown of capitalism—the tech capital of the world and a gusher of wealth from the Silicon Gold Rush. It has been generating jobs, spawning new innovation, and spreading ideas that are changing lives everywhere. It boasts of being the Left Coast, the Greenest City, and the best place for workers in the USA. So what could be wrong? It may seem that the Bay Area has the best of it in Trump’s America, but there is a dark side of success: overheated bubbles and spectacular crashes; exploding inequality and millions of underpaid workers; a boiling housing crisis, mass displacement, and severe environmental damage; a delusional tech elite and complicity with the worst in American politics.

Professor Walker will discuss his new book, a sweeping account of the Bay Area in the age of the tech boom. He'll begin with the phenomenal concentration of IT in Greater Silicon Valley, the fabulous economic growth of the bay region and the unbelievable wealth piling up for the 1% and high incomes of Upper Classes—in contrast to the fate of the working class and people of color earning poverty wages and struggling to keep their heads above water. He'll also survey the urban scene, including the greatest housing bubble in the United States, a metropolis exploding in every direction, and a geography turned inside out. Lastly, he'll hit the environmental impact of the boom, the fantastical ideology of TechWorld, and the political implications of the tech-led transformation of the bay region.

Please register to secure your spot.

Thursday, April 26, 4:00 pm
IRLE Director’s Room
Lecture will be followed by a reception.

Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, Apr 17-20

Fri, 2018-04-20 22:31
This course has provided California's traffic engineers and planners with core training for more than three decades. Contents are regularly updated to reflect current practices and new issues. The course spans the full range of key areas from characteristics of the transportation system, analysis of flow and capacity, traffic operations, traffic control devices, pedestrian/bicycle facilities, to traffic safety and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The course is taught by a team of expert practicing engineers and academics. Each student receives a copy of the best selling 16th Edition of Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering.

What You Will Learn

Students gain a solid, comprehensive understanding of the basic vocabulary, principles, and working concepts of all major areas of traffic engineering as they are practiced today. Students are also introduced to the essential traffic engineering tool kit used to analyze roadway and traffic operations and to develop projects.

Who Should Attend

This course benefits engineers, planners, and technicians who are new to traffic engineering principles and practices. It should be viewed as the introductory course for other advanced classes on focused topics in traffic engineering.

Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, Apr 17-20

Thu, 2018-04-19 22:32
This course has provided California's traffic engineers and planners with core training for more than three decades. Contents are regularly updated to reflect current practices and new issues. The course spans the full range of key areas from characteristics of the transportation system, analysis of flow and capacity, traffic operations, traffic control devices, pedestrian/bicycle facilities, to traffic safety and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The course is taught by a team of expert practicing engineers and academics. Each student receives a copy of the best selling 16th Edition of Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering.

What You Will Learn

Students gain a solid, comprehensive understanding of the basic vocabulary, principles, and working concepts of all major areas of traffic engineering as they are practiced today. Students are also introduced to the essential traffic engineering tool kit used to analyze roadway and traffic operations and to develop projects.

Who Should Attend

This course benefits engineers, planners, and technicians who are new to traffic engineering principles and practices. It should be viewed as the introductory course for other advanced classes on focused topics in traffic engineering.

Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, Apr 17-20

Wed, 2018-04-18 23:31
This course has provided California's traffic engineers and planners with core training for more than three decades. Contents are regularly updated to reflect current practices and new issues. The course spans the full range of key areas from characteristics of the transportation system, analysis of flow and capacity, traffic operations, traffic control devices, pedestrian/bicycle facilities, to traffic safety and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The course is taught by a team of expert practicing engineers and academics. Each student receives a copy of the best selling 16th Edition of Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering.

What You Will Learn

Students gain a solid, comprehensive understanding of the basic vocabulary, principles, and working concepts of all major areas of traffic engineering as they are practiced today. Students are also introduced to the essential traffic engineering tool kit used to analyze roadway and traffic operations and to develop projects.

Who Should Attend

This course benefits engineers, planners, and technicians who are new to traffic engineering principles and practices. It should be viewed as the introductory course for other advanced classes on focused topics in traffic engineering.